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Chevrolet Impala Headlight

What to Do to Maintain Your Chevrolet Impala Headlight

Since your Chevy Impala can work well even without headlights, you may not pay much attention to these important vehicle components until they shut off and you have no choice but to pull over in the middle of nowhere, in the wee hours of the night. To keep your lights functioning well and looking like new, here are some tips to bear in mind:

  • Implement periodic headlight checks.

It is a good idea that you make it your habit to check your headlights as they can also get crooked. The first thing you need to look at are the lenses, as they can get foggy and turn hazy over time. The light assembly, after being installed for a while, may fail to directly shine ahead as the vehicle gets through bumps and potholes. By doing headlight checks, you'll be able to know if you need a headlight restoration kit.

  • Always check the headlight's alignment.

If you are parking in a covered garage with a solid wall, you can check the aiming of your headlights after you've parked your Chevy. To do this, make sure the vehicle is parked at a level surface and the lights are hitting the wall. If the lights hit the same height on the wall, then your headlights are still aimed properly. If the lights are aimed too high or too low, they are more likely to develop blind spots for other drivers. These blind spots can also affect your ability to clearly see the road.

  • Keep the headlight lenses clean.

Your Chevrolet Impala headlight lenses should always be crystal clear. But in the long run, due to changing of weather and other factors, the lenses may turn yellow—this can affect the quality of lights that come out of the lamps. Besides using a headlight restoration kit, there are several ways to address hazy or yellow headlights, and the process can be done even by novice DIYers.

  • Drive safely to avoid frontal collisions.

Frontal crashes can smash the headlights, breaking them into pieces. So if you don't want that to happen to your headlight assembly, make sure you drive safely to avoid getting involved in a road mishap. It also pays to use car cover as it can protect the lights from scratches when parked.

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  • Diagnosing Common Chevrolet Impala Headlight Problems

    After a few years of being in use, your Chevrolet Impala headlight will eventually get hazy, become misaligned, and eventually stop working. But before you start any fix or replacement, it is important that you diagnose the problem first to be sure of the component that will be repaired or replaced. Below are the common headlight problems you are likely to encounter and the ways to troubleshoot them:

    Only one of the lights is working

    This problem is usually caused by a burned out bulb, but you still have to do troubleshooting first as it can also be caused by corroded or loose electrical connection. Check your manual as it may have information on how long a headlight bulb usually lasts on average and when you should expect your bulb to give up. An average driver who drives 12,000 to 15,000 miles per year may need to replace a headlight every five or six years, depending on how frequent you use your lights. If you frequently drive on rough roads, the lifespan of the lights may be cut short because the vibration and movement may cause the bulb’s delicate filament to fail prematurely.

    Both headlights do not turn on

    If this is the case with your ride, you have to take more time diagnosing the problem as there can be several reasons for such, including a bad fuse, dimmer switch, module, headlight circuit, headlight switch, or wiring defect. If you’ve got a blown fuse, you simply have to replace it and try turning the lights on again. If the fuse seems okay, do further checks using a voltmeter. This way, you’ll know if there’s power at the fuse. This test will also help you determine if there’s fault in the wiring. If during the test you notice that your headlight module or relay doesn’t receive voltage, it is more likely that the cause of the problem is a bad switch.

    Dim headlights

    If the headlights are dim and their brightness changes as the engine is revved, it is possible that the problem is the charging system. This can be diagnosed by checking the charging voltage while the engine is in idle. If the charging system works well, the battery’s voltage should be around 13.5 to 14.5 volts. If you read less than 13 volts, the culprit is most likely the charging system.