Need Assistance? Live Chat

Select by Brand

Get Email Exclusives

Sign up for email updates on the latest exclusive offers

Control Arm

 Shop Control Arm
A control arm is a bar that has a pivot at both ends. Your car has several, including the upper control arm and the lower control arm, which are arranged to form the letter A.
Control arms are part of the suspension system. They attach suspension members to the chassis and manage the motion of the wheels so that it synchronizes with that of the body of the car. They work with bushings, which are cylindrical linings that reduce friction and restrain the auto parts from going every which way.
As a result, you are able to go on joy rides without feeling sick and dizzy, as there is control and smoothness in the movement of the car. The two bottom points of the control arms that form the letter A are attached to the frame of the vehicle while the top point is attached to the spindle. Three or four control arms are placed between the rear axle housing and the frame if you have coil springs in both the front and rear suspensions.
Like other body parts, the control arms should also be lubricated at every oil inspection. Handling and steering could become erratic if the control arms are malfunctioning and the unsteady movements of your car could take away your riding comfort.

Control Arm Articles

  • A Beginner's Guide to Installing a Control Arm 11 January 2013

    Whether you're replacing a faulty control arm or just switching to a high-end performance arm, installing a new control arm in your car requires a bit of patience, skill, and the right tools. In this installation guide, we'll show you how to properly install a control arm on your car.

    Required skill level: Intermediate

    Needed tools and materials

    1. Ball joint separator and press
    2. Ballpeen hammer
    3. Pry bar
    4. Tire iron or breaker bar
    5. Torque wrench

    Prepping the car

    Park your car on a solid level surface and apply the parking brake. Using either a tire iron or a breaker bar, loosen the lug nuts on the wheels but do not remove them. Next, use a floor jack to lift the vehicle and place jack stands underneath both sides of the car. Preferably the jack stands should be placed on the pinch welds and the frame, but if your car has a coil spring with SLA suspension, place one of the stands close to the ball joint.

    Removing the parts

    Once the car is secure, remove the lug nuts and the wheels. Take out the cotter pin and pinch bolt from the ball joint and separate the ball joint from the knuckle with a ball joint separator. Remove the ball joint nut, steering knuckle and other components still connected to the lower control arm. Once they're removed, detach the control arm mounting bolts and control arm itself.

    Installing the new parts

    Press the ball joint in place on the new control arm with a ball joint press. Slip in the control arm with the attached ball joint to its mounting. Line up and start all the bolts but don't tighten them - this is in case the bolts don't line up correctly on the first try. Install the steering knuckle, cotter pin, and other components of the control arm back to their respective places.

    Finishing installation

    Reinstall the front wheels and lug nuts and lower the car to the ground. Once the vehicle is at a normal riding height, torque the lug nuts and control arm mounting bolts according to their proper torque.

  • Important Facts You Need to Know About Control Arm 10 October 2012

    No one wants to have a bumpy ride/ Improve your vehicle's steering control and ensure your wheels smooth movement by getting the right control arm.
    If you remember your childhood cartoons, Fred Finstone drove a car powered by his own feet. That's really funny to look at but in our world today, it isn't possible at all. Not only would you get blisters, but you wouldn't be able to steer your ride smoothly as well. If you're after a smooth ride and an easier time steering your car, you have to be sure you're using a quality control arm.
    A control arm isn't a piece of robotic machinery you'd find in a science-fiction film. It's actually a strut made of high-quality metal. This suspension part is located the bottom and top parts of your front wheel's spindle and consists of an upper and lower control arm. These lower and upper control arms permit your car's front wheels to change direction without any resistance.
    Without the function of this suspension part, you won't have a smooth ride at all. You're going to experience a bumpier ride. There's also a tendency to oversteer or understeer your car whenever you're driving it. If this is what you're avoiding, better have your suspension system checked by a mechanic right away. That way, you'll be avoiding any problems with your car and its suspension system in the future. And if you do need a replacement, better get one right away. Replacement and aftermarket parts are widely available in the market. You can go to your local dealer, or for more convenience, you can always shop for parts online.

  • Control Arm: Just the Facts 03 October 2012

    Your vehicle's suspension system is not just about shocks and springs. These components are important, but there are other equally vital suspension parts that complete the suspension system. Among them is the control arm, a triangular-shaped metal strut that attaches the wheel to the vehicle's frame. Aside from providing support for your vehicle's wheels, though, the control arm also performs a more integral role. The control arm allows the front wheels to change directions whenever you make a turn. Hence, this suspension part really is something you can't drive properly without. There are basically three or four control arms in your vehicle, each unit carrying driving and brake torque. Because of its load-bearing and supportive functions, though, the control arm also commonly experiences early wear and tear. But relax, Auto Parts Deal has the best replacement control arm for your vehicle.


    • Manages the wheels' motion in relation to the vehicle's body

    • Reliably connects suspension parts to the chassis

    • Easy part installation guaranteed

  • Control Arm: What Every Car Owner Should Know 26 September 2012

    All parts of a car, whatever the car's make or model, are susceptible to wear and tear. Especially vulnerable are the suspension parts, like the control arms. You're going to need a control arm kit to replace these arms once they're worn out.The control arms hold and allow the steering knuckle to move vertically, to follow the shape of the road. Each side of an arm has bearings bolted onto the frame or body, and steering knuckle. The ball joint bolted to the steering knuckle is especially susceptible to wear and tear and is a common cause of steering issues.One quick method of testing the ball joints is to hold one with your fingers and wiggle it about. If it offers little to zero resistance, then you definitely need a control arm kit. Otherwise, your car's steering is going to get even worse.Each kit should include control arms and all the necessary mounting hardware. They're available here at Auto Parts Deal.


    • Our control arm kits restore the functions of your car's suspension system.

    • Control arm kits from us come complete with the needed rods and hardware.

    • You can get kits for driver and passenger-side applications.