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Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc

Three Ways to Show that You Care Enough for Your Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc

The brake discs are constantly exposed to heat and pressure, so it is no surprise if they are among the parts of the automobile that often break down or necessitate frequent replacement. However, you can prevent the brake discs in your Toyota Tacoma from succumbing to wear—and save money on repair and replacement in the process—through regular maintenance. Keeping the brake disc in good condition is key to ensuring that your Toyota Tacoma's brakes won't fail when you need them the most. Below are a handful of maintenance tips you can use for your Toyota Tacoma brake disc set in your vehicle:

  • Ease up on the brake pedal.

Frequent braking tends to heat up the brake disc, speeding up wear and, in extreme cases, cause the brake pedal to bob up and down on its own. If you expect to brake frequently while driving, such in heavy traffic, consider running at a slower speed to put less strain on the brakes.

  • Use brake cleaner to clean the disc.

The brake disc tends to accumulate brake dust and grime from regular use. These can prevent it from engaging with the brake pads properly. However, cleaning the disc with typical soap and water will make the surface too slippery. You can use brake cleaner, which is specially formulated to clean the disc surface of impurities without compromising its grip. Most brake cleaners in the market come in a spray bottle, so cleaning can be as simple as spraying the disc and wiping off the excess with a rag.

  • Switch to ceramic or NAO pads.

When the time comes to replace the brake pads, it is a good idea to go for ceramic or non-asbestos organic (NAO) brake pads. Although they cost more than stock semi-metallic brake pads, ceramic and NAO pads are gentler on the brake disc, leading to less disc wear and brake dust residue. Some ceramic/NAO pads sold in the market are also designed to produce less noise when braking. So if you can wiggle a bit more in your budget, consider upgrading to such pads.

Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc Bestsellers View more

  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc Centric $35.75 $29.40

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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc EBC $125.14 $112.63

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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc Powerstop $170.00 $117.11

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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc Pronto $37.37 $40.72

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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc AC Delco $21.86 $19.21

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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc Bendix $24.33 $18.43

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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc Beck Arnley $72.29 $59.23

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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc Brembo $102.49 $54.33

    Brembo Brake Disc


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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc StopTech $103.32 $52.05

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  • Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc Mountain $95.15 $66.46

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  • Three Tips to Ensure Proper Installation of the Toyota Tacoma Brake Disc

    The brake discs of the Toyota Tacoma use friction and heat to slow down the wheels of your truck to a stop, so wear is a regular factor for these components. Manufacturers recommend replacing the brake disc once it is worn down to its minimum required thickness and as soon as you discovered that it has been warped or damaged. Putting on new Toyota Tacoma brake discs—whether to replace your worn-out stock or to upgrade to a high-performance aftermarket rotor—can definitely improve the performance of your truck's brakes. And if you are planning on making the switch in the near future, the following are some tips you might find helpful during the process:

    Tip #1: Clean up the entire brake assembly first.

    Before you slot in your new brake discs, it's important to clean the wheel hub and surrounding areas first. Any debris between the rotor and the hub can cause the rotor to pop out of alignment, resulting in pulsating brake pedals and a wobbly braking performance overall. To clean the hub, spray the area with a brake cleaner and scrub it with a wire brush or a circular brush and drill. The new disc can also be sprayed with the cleaner to remove any traces of grease or machining residue. Make sure to do this in a well-ventilated area while wearing protective gloves and eyewear as the brake cleaner contains acetone and other hazardous chemicals.

    Tip #2: "Bleed" the brakes.

    Bleeding the brakes is a process wherein the hydraulic fluid of the disc brake is drained out and replaced. This will ensure that the new brakes won't give you a "mushy" feel and will engage with only a minimum of pressure from your foot. Also, if you are replacing brake discs due to rust, bleeding will help prevent rust particles from contaminating the brake lines, the brake caliper, and the brake disc itself.

    Tip #3: Break in and test the new brake discs.

    Once the new brake discs are in place, take the truck out on a driveway or a clear parking lot with no traffic. Step on the brake pedal and put the vehicle into gear; the brakes should hold the vehicle stationary while idling. Next, accelerate to 5 mph, gradually increasing speed while stepping on the brake at regular intervals. If you encounter any braking troubles doing this test, check the brake discs again for proper fitment.