OBD-II Trouble Codes

P0069 Code: Manifold Absolute Pressure – Barometric Pressure Correlation

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Modern vehicles are equipped with on-board diagnostic (OBD) systems to help you or a mechanic identify issues in your vehicle. One example of an OBD-II code that may be logged on various makes and models is code P0069. Here’s some information that may be helpful if your scan tool reads this code. 

What Does the P0069 Code Mean?

Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P0069 stands for “Manifold Absolute Pressure – Barometric Pressure Correlation.” It is logged when the powertrain control module (PCM) detects that the difference between the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor voltage and the barometric (BARO) sensor reading varies too much.

Once the throttle is at a wide open position, the PCM may also check if the voltage signals from your MAP and BARO sensors are correct.

closeup of car intake manifold with rubber and metal pipes
Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P0069 is logged when the powertrain control module (PCM) detects that the difference between the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor voltage and the barometric (BARO) sensor reading varies too much.

A MAP sensor’s main function is to monitor the pressure in the engine manifold. It’s used by the PCM to monitor engine load. It converts engine vacuum into an electrical signal that is sent to the PCM. As your car accelerates under load, the engine vacuum also drops. A drop in engine vacuum means that the absolute pressure in the intake manifold has increased. 

Vehicle engines may also come equipped with a barometric pressure sensor. This sensor detects subtle changes in atmospheric air pressure. It then converts this signal to an electrical signal that is sent to the PCM for interpretation. 

In most cases, the MAP sensor and BARO sensor are contained within the same housing. The MAP sensor is connected to manifold vacuum, while the BARO sensor is vented to the atmosphere. However, there are some vehicles where the MAP sensor and BARO sensor are stand-alone components.  

Input from these sensors and other crucial sensors, such as the mass airflow sensor and throttle position sensor, is used by the PCM to monitor load and altitude. 

Note: The definition of code P0069 may be different depending on the vehicle manufacturer. Consult the appropriate repair manual or repair database for the exact code definition. 

What are the Possible Causes of the P0069 Code? 

Here are the possible triggers of this error code: 

What are the Common Symptoms of a P0069 Code? 

How to Diagnose a P0069 Code 

Diagnosing a P0069 code can prove challenging. If you’re not a seasoned DIYer, the best course of action is to take your vehicle to an auto repair shop. A mechanic would know how to diagnose and identify the root cause of the problem. 

However, if you prefer to diagnose the code yourself, we suggest consulting a vehicle-specific repair manual or an online database to help you identify the right diagnostic procedures for your vehicle. 

engine of a car
Is your car experiencing engine performance problems such as lack of power and stalling? These are common symptoms of a P0069 code.

How to Fix a P0069 Code 

There is no universal fix for code P0069. Remember that vehicles are made and configured differently, so the exact diagnostic and repair procedures may vary depending on the vehicle you’re trying to fix. For example, repair steps for a code P0069 on a Mitsubishi may not work for a code P0069 on a Mazda. 

If you have the tools and the technical know-how to do the repairs yourself, consult a vehicle-specific repair manual or invest in an online database subscription. These resources contain information that may be helpful for fixing the P0069 code.

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