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Summary
  • The diagnostic trouble code (DTC) P2033 indicates “Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit High Bank 1 Sensor 2.”
  • The powertrain control module (PCM) will trigger this code if it detects a high voltage condition in the exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensor.
  • A P2033 code might also get logged if you remove the catalytic converter and the EGT sensor.
  • If the EGT sensor can’t function without back pressure, the P2033 code might get reported.
  • Common causes of the P2033 code are loose or corroded connectors or terminals, broken wires, missing insulation, and a faulty EGT sensor.
  • The symptoms of a P2033 code are an illuminated check engine light and reduced engine performance.

One of the trouble codes you might encounter when you connect a scan tool to your vehicle is P2033. Before getting started on clearing this code, you first have to answer the question “what is a P2033 code?”

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What Does the P2033 Code Mean?

Diagnostic trouble code (DTC) P2033 code stands for “Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit High Bank 1 Sensor 2.” This code applies to most vehicles manufactured from 1996 onwards.

A P2033 code can be stored in your vehicle’s powertrain control module (PCM) due to a variety of factors. The code can refer to a high voltage condition in the exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensor located near the catalytic converter. The EGT sensor is a heat sensitive resistor that converts the exhaust temperature into a voltage signal for the PCM. It’s designed to protect the catalytic converter from heat damage. If the PCM receives a high voltage signal from the EGT sensor, it will adjust the engine timing or fuel ratio to keep the catalytic converter within the ideal temperature range.

mechanic using obd scanner
The P2003 code can refer to a high voltage condition in the EGT sensor located near the catalytic converter.

A P2033 code can also be stored if the catalytic converter and EGT sensor are removed. If the EGT sensor is unable to function without back pressure, the PCM might set the code.  To keep your vehicle from experiencing additional issues, you must immediately troubleshoot this code.

See also  P0429 Code: Catalyst Heater Control Circuit (Bank 1)

Note: The definition of code P2033 might be different depending on the vehicle manufacturer. Consult the appropriate repair manual or repair database for the exact code definition.

What are the Common Causes of the P2033 Code?

A P2033 code can be caused by a number of factors. Here are some of the most common causes of P2033 code.

  • Loose or corroded connectors or terminals
  • Broken wires or missing insulation
  • Malfunctioning EGT sensor
  • Removal of catalytic converter and EGT sensor
  • Faulty PCM

What are the Common Symptoms of the P2033 Code?

The symptoms of a P2033 code aren’t readily recognizable. If your PCM is storing this code, you might notice the following symptoms.

broken car wires
Broken wires or missing insulation can result in logged P2033 code.

How to Diagnose the P2033 Code

Diagnosing a 2033 code can be complicated. You’ll have to consult your vehicle’s repair manual to learn its recommended diagnostic and repair procedures. The following video features a basic guide on how to diagnose this code, but you still need to do some research to get a better understanding of your vehicle’s problems.

See also  P0429 Code: Catalyst Heater Control Circuit (Bank 1)

How to Fix the P2033 Code

There’s more than one way to resolve a P2033 code. Keep in mind that your vehicle’s make and model will determine its diagnostic and repair procedures. What might work to resolve a P2033 code for a Ford might not work for a Honda.  If you don’t have the required skills and knowledge to fix this DTC, we recommend asking a mechanic to do the repairs for you.

However, if you want to troubleshoot this code yourself, you should start by researching your vehicle’s common problems. Fortunately, there are a lot of OBD-II resources out there. You can get Chilton repair manuals that contain useful information. ALLDATA has a single-vehicle subscription service that should help you figure things out.

About The Authors
Written By Automotive and Tech Writers

The CarParts.com Research Team is composed of experienced automotive and tech writers working with (ASE)-certified automobile technicians and automotive journalists to bring up-to-date, helpful information to car owners in the US. Guided by CarParts.com's thorough editorial process, our team strives to produce guides and resources DIYers and casual car owners can trust.

Reviewed By Contact Center Manager and Technical Reviewer at CarParts.com

William “Bill” Guzenski has produced hundreds of how-to videos for the automotive community. He’s an ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician, and is affiliated with the Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA). He loves attending race events and car shows throughout the country, as well as traveling in his 40-foot motorhome, exploring abandoned mines and ghost towns.

Any information provided on this Website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace consultation with a professional mechanic. The accuracy and timeliness of the information may change from the time of publication.

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