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Summary
  • Blue laws prohibit some activities on specific days such as Sundays to honor the Sabbath, which is the day for worship and rest for Christians and Jews. These laws vary per state.
  • Car sales are banned on Sundays in 12 states: Colorado, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Maine, Mississippi, Louisiana, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
  • Car dealers may also be closed on Sundays to give their employees a day off from work.
  • Banks are also closed on Sundays, so dealerships might find it difficult to do business since auto loans won’t go through.

Weekends are the best time for leisure, which can involve a visit to your local dealership and shopping for a new car. Unfortunately, you should know that many car dealerships are closed on Sundays. Before you find yourself at a dealership wondering “Why are dealerships closed on Sunday?” you should know that there are three good reasons why this is the case.

Blue Laws

Blue laws prohibit certain activities on specific days, most notably Sunday. Some states have blue laws that explicitly prohibit car sales on Sundays. Blue laws were made to honor the Sabbath, which is the day for worship and rest for Christians and Jews.

Modern blue laws mainly prohibit the sale of alcohol. Before 1985, Texas blue laws prohibited the sale of items like cars and liquor, knives, pots, pans and even washing machines.

Blue laws vary in every state.  Car sales on Sundays are banned in 12 states: Colorado, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Maine, Mississippi, Louisiana, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Other states have similar laws, but they don’t completely restrict sales. Instead, they just restrict how people can purchase vehicles.

Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, North Dakota, Texas, Rhode Island, and Utah, for example, don’t explicitly ban car purchases on Sundays. However, they can limit the hours during which dealerships can sell cars that day.

This might seem like a huge hassle, especially for potential customers who have busy work weeks and can only find time on Sundays. Luckily, people looking for cars who live in states like California, New York, and Florida don’t have to worry about these laws.

To Give Salesmen a Day Off

Selling cars can be a tiring job given that the vehicle market is highly competitive. That said, car dealers can be closed on Sundays so that they can give their employees time for themselves. Day offs also give people time to rest and prevent overwork. After all, nobody would want to work in a job that takes up all their time.

Because Banks Are Closed

Vehicle dealerships rely on bank auto loans so that customers can purchase vehicles and just pay for them in installments. However, since banks are closed on Sundays, dealerships might find it difficult to do business since auto loans won’t go through.

Ultimately, the reasons behind Sunday closures vary, but they reflect a complex interplay of tradition, employee well-being, and practicality in the modern automotive industry, depending on the state you’re in. If you live in a state with blue laws and are looking for car dealerships that are open on Sunday, perhaps you should visit online vehicle sale websites and forums instead.

About The Author
Written By Automotive and Tech Writers

The CarParts.com Research Team is composed of experienced automotive and tech writers working with (ASE)-certified automobile technicians and automotive journalists to bring up-to-date, helpful information to car owners in the US. Guided by CarParts.com's thorough editorial process, our team strives to produce guides and resources DIYers and casual car owners can trust.

Any information provided on this Website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace consultation with a professional mechanic. The accuracy and timeliness of the information may change from the time of publication.

File Under : Lifestyle , For the Car Owner
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