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Auxiliary Air Valve

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Auxiliary Air Valve - Direct Fit
Motorcraft®
Part Number: MICM3461
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$12.89
Product Details
Location : FrontAnticipated Ship Out Time : Same day - 1 business dayQuantity Sold : Sold individually
Auxiliary Air Valve - Direct Fit
Motorcraft®
Part Number: MICM3461
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$12.89
Product Details
Anticipated Ship Out Time : Same day - 1 business dayQuantity Sold : Sold individually
Auxiliary Air Valve - Direct Fit
Motorcraft®
Part Number: MICM3462
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$9.89
Product Details
Anticipated Ship Out Time : Same day - 1 business dayQuantity Sold : Sold individually
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Auxiliary Air Valve Guides

Automotive DIY: Auxiliary Air Valve Cleanup and Repair

Your air control valve could get an immense amount of carbon buildup that sticks unto it, resulting in you losing control of your car's idle. To be more specific, even at a high RPM your automobile can go idle or it can stall at a low RPM. Cleanup of the idle auxiliary air control valve is a necessity to keep you from having to install a new part. However, only certain models of valves could be cleaned.

Difficulty Level:Easy to Moderate

What You'll Need

  • ¼-inch ratchet
  • Set of ¼-inch sockets
  • Screwdriver
  • Carburetor cleaner
  • Auxiliary air valve replacement (in case cleanup fails)

Step 1:Search for the idle auxiliary air valve of your vehicle's engine. Usually, it's located on your engine's intake side. It's also usually near the A/C valve for reference. When removed out of your car, it's mostly composed of hoses and pipes sticking out like a mechanical octopus.

Step 2:Use your screwdriver in order to remove the electrical plug on the back of the air control valve. Be careful not to break the plastic tang that connects the wiring harness to the sensor. This is what's keeping the wiring harness from vibrating off of the sensor, resulting in misalignment.

Step 3:The next thing on your agenda is the removal of the bolts and/or screws holding the idle air control valve on the block. If the cleanup doesn't work, then simply skip toward Step 7, which is the part where you replace your valve with a new valve.

Step 4:Point the valve downward and spray the pointed end with your carburetor cleaner. After you're done applying it on the auxiliary valve, wipe it clean completely. It's also important to not let any of the cleaner drip into the housing. Do this repeatedly until the stuck carbon is removed.

Step 5:Reattach the air valve plus the wiring harness. Go about it in reverse order. Put the valve in with all its nuts, bolts, and/or screws then carefully put the wires back without breaking the aforementioned plastic tang.

Step 6: Start your car to check if it's idling properly. Have a test drive and observe the behavior of your engine after the carbon cleanup. Is it still shutting down when you come to a stop or turn a corner (especially with your A/C on)? If it does, then replacing the auxiliary valve is needed.

Step 7: When all else fails, just order for a good auxiliary air valve off of the Internet that is the perfect fitment for your make, model, and year of car (or at least find the closest OE-standard aftermarket option available). From there, just follow Steps 1-3 for valve removal and then do Step 5 with your replacement valve instead of your old, carbon-filled one.

You should have a spring-operated valve ready for cleanup to make the following instructions work. Otherwise, it's best to get a replacement for your valve ASAP. When putting on the carburetor cleaner on your valve, don't let any of it end up on the electrical connections of your car. Get as little of it as possible in the body of your valve.

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