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Summary
  • Code P2016  stands for “Intake Manifold Runner Position Sensor/Switch Circuit Low Bank 1.”
  • This code may be logged when the PCM detects a problem with Bank 1 of your engine’s cylinders or when the value provided by the intake manifold runner control valve/position sensor (also known as the IMRC valve/sensor) might be incorrect.
  • A malfunctioning IMRC actuator relay, a bad IMRC actuator/sensor, or a faulty PCM can cause this error code to be set.
  • Reduced engine power and poor fuel economy are some of the symptoms associated with this trouble code.

One of the diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) you might encounter is P2016. In this article, you’ll learn all about the P2016 code, its common symptoms, possible causes, and recommended fixes.

What Does the P2016 Code Mean?

Code P2016  stands for “Intake Manifold Runner Position Sensor/Switch Circuit Low Bank 1.” It’s a generic powertrain code that applies to many newer vehicles.

See also  P0076 Code: Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low Bank 1

A P2016 code might mean that your powertrain control module (PCM) has detected a problem with Bank 1 of your engine’s cylinders. The value provided by the intake manifold runner control valve/position sensor (also known as the IMRC valve/sensor) might be incorrect, which can disrupt the flow of air in the engine. This problem might be caused by an electrical circuit fault or a mechanical failure within the IMRC system.

intake manifold runner valve
The P2016 code might mean that your PCM has detected a problem with Bank 1 of your engine’s cylinders due to the incorrect value provided by the IMRC valve/sensor.

A deeper understanding of IMRC configurations can help you address P2016 if you plan to diagnose or fix the issue yourself.

Note: The definition of code P2016 may be different depending on the vehicle manufacturer. Consult the appropriate repair manual or repair database for the exact code definition.

What are the Common Causes of the P2016 Code?

A P2016 code doesn’t necessarily mean that your IMRC actuator/sensor has failed. In some cases, a P2016 code can be triggered by several failed parts. Make sure to check your system to get an accurate diagnosis. Here are some of the possible causes of the P2016 code:

  • Malfunctioning IMRC actuator relay (if equipped)
  • Bad IMRC actuator/sensor
  • Faulty Powertrain Control Module
See also  P2004 Code: Intake Manifold Runner Control Solenoid Bank 1 – Solenoid Stuck Open
car fuel gauge
One of the common symptoms of the P2016 code is bad fuel economy.

What are the Common Symptoms of the P2016 Code?

The P2016 code might be accompanied by other DTCs, so you might observe some symptoms not listed here. However, if your PCM is only storing this particular code, your vehicle might exhibit the following symptoms.

How to Diagnose the P2016 Code

There are multiple potential causes for your P2016 code, which can make your vehicle difficult to diagnose. If you’re planning to do some DIY repairs, we recommend watching the following video to learn the general diagnostic procedures involved in troubleshooting this code.

How to Fix the P2016 Code

A P2016 code might be stored for a variety of reasons. Therefore, there’s no cookie-cutter solution for troubleshooting this code. As mentioned earlier, you’ll have to consult your vehicle’s repair manual to find the recommended diagnostic and repair steps for your DTC. You can also check out technical service bulletins for known fixes to save time and money on troubleshooting.

See also  P0082 Code: Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low Bank 2

If you have an OBD-II scanner and the required repair skills, you can probably resolve a P2016 code on your own. There are lots of credible OBD-II resources online, which have the information you need to repair your vehicle. Chilton repair manuals are certainly useful, but we recommend an ALLDATA subscription. ALLDATA offers single-vehicle subscriptions that include detailed factory repair information.

However, you can also opt to get your vehicle serviced by a certified mechanic. They can diagnose your vehicle and perform the appropriate repairs, so you don’t need to worry.

About The Authors
Written By Automotive and Tech Writers

The CarParts.com Research Team is composed of experienced automotive and tech writers working with (ASE)-certified automobile technicians and automotive journalists to bring up-to-date, helpful information to car owners in the US. Guided by CarParts.com's thorough editorial process, our team strives to produce guides and resources DIYers and casual car owners can trust.

Reviewed By Technical Reviewer at CarParts.com

Richard McCuistian has worked for nearly 50 years in the automotive field as a professional technician, an instructor, and a freelance automotive writer for Motor Age, ACtion magazine, Power Stroke Registry, and others. Richard is ASE certified for more than 30 years in 10 categories, including L1 Advanced Engine Performance and Light Vehicle Diesel.

Any information provided on this Website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace consultation with a professional mechanic. The accuracy and timeliness of the information may change from the time of publication.

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