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Brake Line Lock

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Hurst 5671517 Brake Line Lock - Direct Fit
Hurst®
Part Number: H245671517
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$256.95
Product Details
Notes : Stainless SteelWarranty : 1-year Hurst limited warrantyAnticipated Ship Out Time : 2-3 business daysQuantity Sold : Kit
Hurst 5671518 Brake Line Lock - Direct Fit
Hurst®
Part Number: H245671518
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$238.95
Product Details
Notes : Stainless SteelWarranty : 1-year Hurst limited warrantyAnticipated Ship Out Time : 2-3 business daysQuantity Sold : Kit
Hurst 5671519 Brake Line Lock - Direct Fit
Hurst®
Part Number: H245671519
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$265.95
Product Details
Notes : Stainless SteelWarranty : 1-year Hurst limited warrantyAnticipated Ship Out Time : 2-3 business daysQuantity Sold : Kit
Hurst 5671521 Brake Line Lock - Direct Fit
Hurst®
Part Number: H245671521
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$274.95
Product Details
Notes : Stainless SteelWarranty : 1-year Hurst limited warrantyAnticipated Ship Out Time : 2-3 business daysQuantity Sold : Kit
B&M 46076 Brake Line Lock - Universal
B&M®
Part Number: B3246076
Universal Fit
$107.95
Product Details
Anticipated Ship Out Time : 2-3 business daysQuantity Sold : Sold individually
Page 1 of 1 | Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results

Brake Line Lock Guides

Looking for the Right Brake Line Lock

The brake line lock is one of the many possible upgrades in one's vehicle. While your car can work just fine without them, the brake line lock can do considerable improvement in your car's performance. This is precisely why countless on- and off-road drivers prefer to have a brake line lock in their braking systems. If you are planning to ride on the bandwagon, it is better to equip yourself with knowledge. Following are some information you need to consider before buying a new brake line lock for your car.

Ball valve vs. solenoid valve

Two kinds of brake line locks are most common in the aftermarket industry today-the one with ball valve and the one with solenoid valve. While both are effective and good in their own ways, it's better to see which one will be perfect for your car.

A ball valve brake line lock is relatively larger than the solenoid valve. It has a high flow rate that can deliver considerable amount of brake fluid to your wheels for better control. However, also due to its size, it is difficult to find a place for it install inside the car. Also, it reacts slower than the solenoid valve.

The solenoid valve, on the other hand, is lightweight and compact, making it easier to install. It has a fail-safe design that is normally open or closed. In addition, this kind of brake line lock reacts faster and has higher life cycle than the ball valve. However, the solenoid valve accommodates lower amount of pressure than the ball valve.

Work under pressure

One major consideration in buying a brake line lock is the amount of pressure it can handle. The device's reliability largely depends on this particular aspect. A typical brake line lock for on-road purposes can handle a pressure of 1,500 psi. However, there are brake line locks in the market offering greater braking power with 3,000 psi. Think of how much you will be needing the brake line lock and determine the amount of pressure your car would most likely require.

Easy installation

The brake line lock is usually sold in a kit with other tiny parts. These parts are to be installed and mounted onto your car individually. If you do not consider yourself as a do-it-yourself person but would want to install this device to your car, you might want to consider the ease of the installation of the brake line lock. Check the instruction manuals and see if you can handle the process. Take note that the small parts will be installed near crucial parts of the car and one mistake can cause a lot.

Installation of Brake Line Lock

The brake line lock is a good upgrade most especially for off-road vehicles. It offers additional braking power, allowing better control of the car. Also, it allows burnout which cleans the wheel as it rolls while in stationary position. Also, installing the device is relatively easier compared to most parts. Because the parts are smaller and lightweight, brake line locks can be installed in just a maximum of two hours. Below are simple steps on how you can install a new brake line lock to your car.

Difficulty level: Moderate

Tools required:

  • Brake line fittings
  • Correct-sized bushing adapters
  • Cutting pliers
  • Drill
  • Impact gun
  • Teflon tape

Step 1: Connect the bushing adapter to the valve ports of the brake line lock with the use of Teflon tape.

Step 2: Open your hood or go under your car. Look for the best location where the brake line lock can be installed. It should be between the master brake cylinder and the front wheel cylinders. Note that it should be in a place with enough room and least line bending.

Step 3: Mount the brake line lock to the location found using a drill and/or an impact gun.

Step 4: Connect the brake lines into the adapters of the valve. Avoid fluid leaking with the use of brake line fittings. Ensure that the lines are connected to the proper valve ports.

Step 5: Connect the valve wires using a barrel connector. Of the two wires, one is colored black. Make sure this ground wire is attached to a clean area.

Step 6: Put a fuse holder between the brake line lock and the 12-volt power source.

Step 7: Disconnect the battery to begin installing the micro-switch.

Step 8: Look for a perfect location for the micro-switch between the steering wheel, shifter, brake line lock, and the 12-volt power source.

Step 9: Mount the micro-switch to the location chosen.

Step 10: Measure the 22-guage wire needed to join the micro-switch with the 12-volt power source on one side and the brake line lock on the other. Consider the length needed that can accommodate the turning of the steering wheel.

Step 11: Connect these wires to the micro-switch and make sure that the correct wire is joined into the correct outlet. Connect the red wire to the brake line lock; the black wire with the positive side of the micro-switch.

Step 12: Reconnect the battery of the car.

Step 13: To release air build up, make the brake system bleed.

Step 14: Refill brake fluid into the system.

Step 15: Test the vehicle. It is advisable to have it tested while being lifted.

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