Safety, Shipping, Service
In the face of COVID-19, we remain committed to you.
Select your vehicle
Refine by:

Heater Core

Showing 1 - 15 of 452 results
Display item:
15
30
45
Sort by:
Heater Core 11.12 x 7.19 x 1.69 in. Core - w/o Inlet & Outlet O-Ring
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$27.13
Product Details
Location : FrontNotes : Without O-ring inlet and outletReplaces OE Number : 4886528ACReplaces Partslink Number : CH3128100Replaces DPI Number : 9935Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core 6.5 x 6 x 1.5 in. Core, 0.63 in. Inlet, 0.63 in. Outlet
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$27.19
Product Details
Location : RearReplaces OE Number : 5019184AAReplaces Partslink Number : CH3128101Replaces DPI Number : 8044Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: SET-REPD503002-2
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$51.60
Product Details
Location : Front And RearNotes : Without O-ring inlet and outletComponents : (2) Heater CoresReplaces OE Number : 5019184AA, 4886528ACReplaces Partslink Number : CH3128101, CH3128100Quantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPT503005
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$41.00
Product Details
Location : FrontNotes : Hose clamp, slip-on; Brazed core typeReplaces OE Number : 8710707030Replaces DPI Number : 80011Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPT503005
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$41.00
Product Details
Notes : Hose clamp, slip-on; Brazed core typeReplaces OE Number : 8710707030Replaces DPI Number : 80011Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPF503006
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$26.80
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : F5TZ18476AReplaces Partslink Number : FO3128104Replaces DPI Number : 8310Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPF503010
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$37.94
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : F65Z18476AAReplaces Partslink Number : FO3128100Replaces DPI Number : 9927Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPF503010
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$37.94
Product Details
Location : FrontReplaces OE Number : F65Z18476AAReplaces Partslink Number : FO3128100Replaces DPI Number : 9927Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core 7.5 x 6 in. 1 in. Core, 0.75 in. Inlet and Outlet - w/ Connections
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$34.14
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : 271403S500, B714030P50Replaces DPI Number : 80153Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPC503001
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$26.50
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : 4874040Replaces DPI Number : 8438Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPV503001
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$27.46
Product Details
Location : FrontReplaces OE Number : 91715037Replaces Partslink Number : VO3128100Replaces DPI Number : 80008Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPV503001
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$27.46
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : 91715037Replaces Partslink Number : VO3128100Replaces DPI Number : 80008Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: REPV503004
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$21.54
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : 13072368Replaces DPI Number : 8596Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: RH50300001
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$28.88
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : 79110S84A01Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Heater Core
Part Number: RC50300003
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$35.04
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : 96887038Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year Replacement unlimited-mileage warranty
Page 1 of 31 | Showing 1 - 15 of 452 results

Heater Core Customer Reviews

Purchased on undefined

Heater Core Guides

What Type of Heater Core Should You Buy?

Your car has to be as comfortable as it can be when you're driving. Without a good heating system, it's just like driving a cold storage truck on the road. So when you notice fog on your windshield or wet spots on your carpet, it's about time you change your heater core. Here are some things you have to consider when buying a new one:

Your car's engine and A/C system

Just because your car has a heating system, it doesn't necessarily mean that it has a heater core. Older car models use air-cooled systems, which do not use heater cores to heat up the passenger compartment. Instead, these models use air from their motor's cooling fans and channel it into the cabin to be used as heat. So unless you're running on a water-cooled engine, the heater core is the least of your problems. But if your car has one, check on your fans or other parts of your air-conditioning system for possible leakage. This way, you'll know if you need to replace any busted part.

Types of heater core

The two most popular types are aluminum and copper heater cores. Aluminum heater cores are used in most cars today, which makes finding an OE replacement easier. But if you're going for durability, aluminum types might not be your best bet. The mixing of metals within the aluminum tubing is responsible for corrosion, which is best avoided by using copper-type heater cores. Copper heater cores are generally heavier and more durable. They also transfer heat better. Although they have a shorter lifespan than aluminum types, around 5 years or 50,000 miles, copper heater cores are usually cheaper and preferred by many. Because of their more efficient design, they can generate heat better and faster.

High-quality OE replacement parts

It might surprise you to know that the cost of operating your heating system is more than the cost of purchasing it. Maintenance of your heater core, such as regular replacing of coolant and flushing of your system, can have a long-term impact on your wallet. The best way to reduce the operating costs is by choosing a high-efficiency, durable heater core. Go for a high-quality OE replacement for this heating system component to decrease the likelihood of leaks caused by an ill-fitting replacement part. Also make sure that your heater core is backed by a warranty with reasonable coverage to ensure you get exactly what you're paying for.

Steps in Installing a New Heater Core

Your car isn't blowing off steam just because it wants to. The hot air coming from under your hood is a sign of a bad heater core. Replace your faulty heater core with these easy steps:

Difficulty level: Easy to moderate

Things you'll need:

  • Socket wrench
  • Drainage pan/plastic sheets
  • 1 gallon 50/50 coolant mix
  • New heater core

Step 1: Preparing your car

Before working on your heater core, make sure you've disconnected the negative cable from your battery terminal. After you've plugged the battery cable, lift the hood of your car.

Step 2: Locating your heater core

Some heater cores are harder to access than most. So if you can't see your heater core right away, refer to your manufacturer's repair manual to locate it. Once you've located your heater core, place either a drainage pan or plastic sheets under it and its coolant hoses to catch any coolant that may leak from the hoses.

Step 3: Removing your heater core

Using a socket wrench, unscrew the couplings of the hoses attached to your heater core. Let all the coolant flow out into your pan and then pull out the hoses. Remove your heater core from its place.

Step 4: Installing your new heater core

Before installing your heater core, check the intake/outake hoses for any damage. Replace them if necessary to avoid premature damage to your new heater core. Install your heater core by reconnecting the hoses in the same manner as step 3. Secure the new heater core in place.

Step 5: Preparing for your heater core testing

Carefully pull out the plastic sheets or pan and dispose of the coolant. Replace any lost coolant from your heater core with a fresh 50/50 mix.

Step 6: Testing your new heater core

Reconnect your negative cable to your battery and close the hood of your car. After starting your car for the testing, allow it to reach the operating temperature before measuring results to ensure accuracy.

Heater Core Buyer’s Guide

Summary 

  • The heater core is part of your car’s cooling system and it works the same way as the radiator. 
  • Heater cores are often mounted on the opposite side of the radiator, which is under the cowl and inside the dashboard.
  • Coolant contaminants, gunk, and corrosion, which are the common enemies of your radiator, also affect the heater core.
  • Foggy windows, strong odor in the cabin, consistently low coolant level, and a cabin that remains cool despite cranking the heater dial are among the symptoms of a failing heater core.
  • Prolonging a heater core problem may cause issues to your vehicle’s cooling system, which could lead to engine overheating.
  • OE heater core replacements on CarParts.com could cost you from $4 to $350, depending on the brand, design, and location of installation.

Your car’s heating system or heater is an important feature that passes heat into the cabin on colder days. The heating system inside your car primarily consists of a device called the heater core, which looks like a scaled-down radiator. What it does is disperse heat to defrost or defog your windows and at the same time provide comfort to all occupants when the temperature is freezing cold. 

How does a heater core work?

The heater core is part of your car’s cooling system and it works the same way as the radiator. Both components cool the antifreeze fluid down through the winding tubes inside by means of heat transfer. However, the radiator disperses the hot air to the atmosphere while the heater core directs it into the cabin. 

The water pump delivers the coolant to the components that make up the cooling system. Some of the hot coolant that exits the vehicle flows through a series of heater hoses that lead to the heater core. The flow of coolant is controlled by the heater valve, which is typically mounted near the firewall. The hot coolant then passes through the winding tubes of the core and a fan forces the heat from the coolant by blowing them toward the cabin.

Where is the heater core located?

Is your car heater not working? The first thing you need to do is to examine the part for visual leaks. But accessing the heater core is not as easy as it sounds. Most vehicles have their heater core deep within the dashboard, making them very difficult to access. Heater cores are often mounted on the opposite side of the radiator, which is usually found at the front. That said, you can find the heater core directly under the cowl.

You can access the heater core from the engine bay or by removing the dashboard. Working on your car’s heater core can be tricky as you’ll need to remove almost every component inside the dashboard. The heater core is usually found on the passenger side of the dashboard. Vehicles with dual-zone climate control have two heater cores on each side for both the driver and front passenger. Meanwhile, larger vehicles have an additional rear heater core for the passengers at the back.

Types of heater core

The two most popular types are aluminum and copper heater cores. Aluminum heater cores are used in most cars today, which makes finding a replacement easier. But if you're going for durability, aluminum types might not be your best bet. The mixing of metals within the aluminum tubing is responsible for corrosion, which is best avoided by using copper-type heater cores. Copper heater cores are generally heavier and more durable. They also transfer heat better. Although they have a shorter lifespan than aluminum types, around 5 years or 50,000 miles, copper heater cores are usually cheaper and preferred by many. Because of their more efficient design, they can generate heat better and faster.

What causes heater cores to malfunction?

Since the radiator and heater core are almost identical in terms of function and structural design, both components share the same causes of problems. Coolant contaminants, gunk, and corrosion, which are also the enemy of your radiator, also affect the heater core. The only difference is that the heater core could wear quicker due to narrower tubes that can easily get clogged. Proper maintenance, such as routinely changing your coolant, can save you from having a bad heater core. You may perform a heater core flush by using a heater core flush kit.

Symptoms of a failing heater core

A failing heater core is an inconvenience to you and your passengers, especially during the winter. Consider bringing your vehicle to a certified mechanic when you experience one of these symptoms:

Windows easily get foggy

Window fog is a normal phenomenon. However, if the fogging is accompanied by a strange strong odor, then it probably means your coolant has blown up and the coolant is leaking into the cabin. When the heat from the leaked coolant touches the cold air in the cabin, it condenses and produces the mist that you see on your windows.

Odd smell in the cabin

You should never ignore a weird smell in the cabin as it could be an indicator of a serious problem. Strong odor inside the cabin can be caused by different factors such as refrigerant and coolant leaks. The coolant’s odor is described as a sweet-alcoholic smell that’s toxic to humans if inhaled in large amounts. This smell is a clear indication of a failing heater core.

Coolant level that’s often low

If your vehicle has been chugging on antifreeze, chances are you have a leak somewhere along the cooling system lines. If you managed to check everything and found nothing, it could be leaking from the heater core. Heater core leaks would require you to access the assembly either through the dashboard area or from under the hood. Access to the heater core depends on the design of your vehicle. Refer to your car owner’s manual or visit a certified mechanic to ensure proper disassembly of parts.

A cabin that remains cold despite switching the heater on

Cranking the heater dial should immediately change the temperature of the air coming out from the vents. If the cabin remains cold even after switching the heater mode, your heater core may be failing. A hole in the heater core may be causing coolant to leak and escape before it gets blown off by the fan. The bigger the hole, the colder your cabin will be as more of the hot coolant passing through the tubes will exit the assembly.

Inconsistent heater operation

Another symptom of a failing heater core is inconsistent heating due to a faulty heater control valve. A damaged heater control valve may disrupt the flow of hot coolant to the heater core. As this happens, the heater produces hot air intermittently and the hot air often wouldn’t last.

Is driving with a damaged heater core okay?

The moment a leak happens in the heater core assembly, that’s when the problems start to arise. Although you can still drive with a bad heater core, as it won’t affect your car’s performance, you still shouldn’t do it for a long time. Prolonging a heater core problem may cause issues to your vehicle’s cooling system, which could lead to engine overheating. Driving without a well-functioning heater core also compromises cabin comfort.

How much is a heater core replacement?

A heater core replacement usually costs around $4 to $350, depending on the brand, design, and location of installation. To get the right fit for your vehicle, input its year, make, and model on the filter tab under the search menu. You may further narrow down your search by utilizing the “Shop By” section and choosing from the different categories like price range, brand, or series.

Steps in Installing a New Heater Core

Your car isn't blowing off steam just because it wants to. The hot air coming from under your hood is a sign of a bad heater core. Replace your faulty heater core with these easy steps:

Difficulty level: Easy to moderate

Things you'll need:

  • Socket wrench
  • Drainage pan/plastic sheets
  • 1 gallon 50/50 coolant mix
  • New heater core

Step 1: Preparing your car

Before working on your heater core, make sure you've disconnected the negative cable from your battery terminal. After you've plugged the battery cable, lift the hood of your car.

Step 2: Locating your heater core

Some heater cores are harder to access than most. So if you can't see your heater core right away, refer to your manufacturer's repair manual to locate it. Once you've located your heater core, place either a drainage pan or plastic sheets under it and its coolant hoses to catch any coolant that may leak from the hoses.

Step 3: Removing your heater core

Using a socket wrench, unscrew the couplings of the hoses attached to your heater core. Let all the coolant flow out into your pan and then pull out the hoses. Remove your heater core from its place.

Step 4: Installing your new heater core

Before installing your heater core, check the intake/outake hoses for any damage. Replace them if necessary to avoid premature damage to your new heater core. Install your heater core by reconnecting the hoses in the same manner as step 3. Secure the new heater core in place.

Step 5: Preparing for your heater core testing

Carefully pull out the plastic sheets or pan and dispose of the coolant. Replace any lost coolant from your heater core with a fresh 50/50 mix.

Step 6: Testing your new heater core

Reconnect your negative cable to your battery and close the hood of your car. After starting your car for the testing, allow it to reach the operating temperature before measuring results to ensure accuracy.

Helpful Automotive Resources

Main Components of Your Cooling System
May 04, 2019
Main Components of Your Cooling System1. RADIATOR: Cools off the anti-freeze/coolant mixture by allowing air passing through the tube/fin area to dissipate the heat generated by the engine.
What’s the Difference Between Your Car’s Air Conditioner & Heater?
July 30, 2020
What’s the Difference Between Your Car’s Air Conditioner & Heater?Most people understand that their home’s heating and air conditioning (A/C) are basically two distinct systems (usually) tied together by ductwork. There’s the A/C unit, which does the cooling, and the furnace, which does the heating.
6 Signs of a Bad Radiator
July 23, 2019
6 Signs of a Bad RadiatorYou know that the radiator is an essential part of your cooling system, but how can you tell when something is wrong? Spotting the signs of a bad radiator is failing isn’t something that most drivers know how to do. If you aren’t a professional mechanic, this part of your
5 Car Date Ideas (and How To Prep Your Car for a Sweet Getaway)
February 07, 2020
5 Car Date Ideas (and How To Prep Your Car for a Sweet Getaway)Love is in the air this month—and if you’re looking for romantic date ideas that won’t break the bank and allow you to avoid the crowds this Valentine’s day, here are some date ideas that you can enjoy from the comfort of your car.
What are the Signs of a Bad Heater Core?
December 29, 2019
What are the Signs of a Bad Heater Core?Imagine this: It’s winter, you’re carrying all your groceries, desperate to rush into the safety of your car to escape the chilly air. You hastily unlock your doors, fumbling with your keys as your gloves get in the way. Once you successfully open the doors and set your groceries down,
12 Last-Minute Gift Ideas
December 06, 2019
12 Last-Minute Gift IdeasReading Time: 4 minutesDon’t know what to get your loved one this year? Nothing says, “I love you,” like going out of your way to fix up their car.
Copyright ©2020 CarParts.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy