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Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$139.75
Product Details
Location : RearNotes : Round Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 4000 lbs. GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 600 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$151.77
Product Details
Notes : Round Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 6000 lbs. GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 900 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$128.36
Product Details
Notes : Square Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 6000 lbs. GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 900 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$133.32
Product Details
Notes : Round Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 4000 lbs. WC/6000 lbs. WD GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 400 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$151.68
Product Details
Notes : Square Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 6000 lbs. GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 900 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$151.68
Product Details
Location : RearNotes : Square Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 6000 lbs. GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 900 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$132.52
Product Details
Notes : Flat Bar Main Body; With Pin And Clip; Ball And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 3500 lbs. GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 350 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$149.37
Product Details
Notes : Round Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 4000 lbs. WC/6000 lbs. WD GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 400 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$134.07
Product Details
Notes : Square Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 6000 lbs. WC/10000 lbs. WD GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 600 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$108.32
Product Details
Notes : Flat Bar Main Body; With Pin And Clip; Ball And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 5000 lbs. WC/5500 lbs. WD GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 500 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$143.64
Product Details
Notes : Square Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 6000 lbs. GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 600 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$117.58
Product Details
Location : RearNotes : Square Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 5000 lbs. WC/6000 lbs. WD GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 500 lbs. WC/600 lbs. WD TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$174.48
Product Details
Notes : Round Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 4000 lbs. WC/5000 lbs. WD GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 400 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$133.77
Product Details
Notes : Round Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 6000 lbs. WC/10000 lbs. WD GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 600 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Class III - Up To 8000 lbs. 2 in. receiver Hitch
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$139.87
Product Details
Notes : Square Main Body; Pin, Clip, Ball, And Ball Mount Sold SeparatelySeries : Curt TrailerClass : Class III - Up To 8000 lbs.Receiver Tube Size : 2 in. receiverMaximum Gross Trailer Weight : 6000 lbs. WC/10000 lbs. WD GTWMaximum Tongue Weight : 600 lbs. TWColor/Finish : Powdercoated BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : Lifetime Curt limited warranty with 1-year warranty on finish
Page 1 of 129 | Showing 1 - 15 of 1925 results

Hitch Customer Reviews

Did this on my buddies lift and that makes it so much easier. I do like how it somewhat hides under the bumper. I think it is heavier duty that the Jeep...
Purchased on Apr 29, 2014
Class III - Up To 8000 Lbs. 2 In. Receiver Hitch
Jun 10, 2019
Great fit and easy installation of the hitch
This hitch was very easy to install by myself. It took less than 30 minutes to do. the included fishwire, really made it easy to "fish" the carriage bolts through the holes in the frame of my Jeep.
Purchased on Dec 16, 2014

Hitch Guides

A hitch is a bolt-in accessory that is used to lift up and apply leverage to the tow vehicle when towing. It can be installed to tow trailers, motorcycles, bikes, garden tractors and other items. Two general types of hitches exist: the weight-carrying hitches and the weight-distributing hitches. Weight-carrying hitches are often used when towing lighter loads while weight-distributing hitches are generally used for larger, heavier trails.
Through innovative designs engineered to fit specific vehicle applications, most hitches nowadays can be easily installed with no extra modifications like drilling or welding. On most applications, hitch installation can take only thirty minutes or less. When installing, make sure the spare tire and the tail pipe are properly mounted. Follow the installation instructions of the hitch supplier.
Always remember to use a hitch that is strong enough to handle the maximum anticipated total weight of the trailer. The weight, however, should not exceed the towing capacity of the vehicle.
Whatever vehicle type you have, there's a hitch just for you. Today's market offers a variety of hitches for a wide range of domestic and import vehicles. Just make sure to choose the proper hitch for your specific vehicle make and you're good to go.

Car Tow Hitches - A Buyer’s Guide

Summary

  • This article will help you pick the hitch that strikes the best balance between your needs and your vehicle’s towing ability. 

  • A car hitch uses either the fixed-drawbar design or the receiver design. Both designs deliver good performance.

  • Load-bearing hitches support the weight of the payload and put the strain on the rear axle. Weight-distributing hitches spread the weight between the front and rear axles.

  • Car hitches get classified according to the specific maximum weight (2,000 lbs to 13,000 lbs) that it can tow without breaking.

  • You want a car hitch that can easily support the loads you expect to tow. For heavier loads, try to get a weight-distributing hitch. Make sure that the payload’s weight doesn’t exceed the maximum weight rating of your car hitch and its parts.

  • A car hitch goes for anywhere between $34 and $362 on CarParts.com. 

Need to haul an object that’s too big and heavy to fit in your vehicle’s trunk, on the cargo bed, or storage racks? You likely must load the payload on a trailer and tow it, but that job requires a hitch that serves as an attachment point for the trailer.

While trailer hitches appear as standard equipment on many larger vehicles like pickup trucks and SUVs, cars rarely roll out of the factory with a hitch. If you have a small boat, camper, or trailer that you expect to tow often, you must buy a hitch and attach it to your vehicle’s rear end.

This article will help you pick the hitch that strikes the best balance between your needs and your vehicle’s towing ability. While the hitch’s rating and your car’s tow rating will determine the maximum load on the trailer, your car can still lug quite the load without straining its framework.

The types of car hitches

A car hitch uses either the fixed-drawbar design or the receiver design. Both designs deliver good performance.

Fixed-drawbar hitches

Also called “fixed tongue hitches,” they are an integral part of the vehicle’s framework. A fixed-drawbar hitch features a flat drawbar and a receptacle that accepts the ball of a trailer’s mounting device.

Receiver type hitch

In comparison, a receiver type hitch is a separate piece of equipment. It mounts to the rear of the vehicle’s framework. The back of the hitch comes with an opening that can take a removable mounting device.

You can attach various mounting devices on the receiver hitch. If you intend to tow something, you can fit a mount for towing trailers or campers.

Depending on the design, car hitches can fit bike racks, bicycles, cargo carriers, and spare tires. Towing hitches can pull campers and trailers of all sizes, and the ATV, boat, horse, or motorcycle loaded aboard the rack or trailer.

Load-bearing hitches and weight-distributing hitches

Many hitches support the weight of the payload themselves. The weight gets concentrated on the rear axle of the towing vehicle with such a load-bearing hitch.

Other hitches follow the weight-distributing system. As their name suggests, these hitches spread the weight of the load between the rear and the front axles of the vehicle.

Weight-distributing hitches prevent heavy loads from damaging the car’s rear. Since the rear axle carries less of the total weight, they undergo less strain than their load-bearing counterparts.

Further, a weight-distributing hitch reduces the chances of towing sag. The extra weight placed on the connection point between the car and its carrier causes the stressed point to sag toward the road. Since a weight-distributing hitch spreads the weight over a larger area, it reduces the weight on the connector and keeps it from sagging.

The downside to a weight-distributing hitch is how installing it requires more parts and work than a simpler load-bearing hitch. Still, the extra performance makes it worth the effort.

Load-bearing hitches can tow any trailer they’re rated for. But if you plan to haul loads that exceed 5,000 pounds regularly, a weight-distributing hitch will handle such heavy loads better while reducing the strain imposed on your car’s framework.

Car hitch classification according to weight

Both load-bearing and weight-distributing car hitches get classified according to the specified maximum weight that it can tow without breaking. The five weight classes are:

  • Class I - 2,000 pounds

  • Class II - up to 3,500 pounds

  • Class III - up to 5,000 pounds

  • Class IV - up to 10,000 pounds

  • Class V - up to 13,000 pounds

There are also “Medium-duty” car hitches that can carry weight loads between Class III and Class IV.

Not all hitches will fit your car. The size of the receiver tube, the part that attaches to the vehicle’s frame, will determine what class of hitch can go on your car.

  • 1.25-inch opening - Class I and II hitches

  • 2-inch opening - Class III to IV hitches

  • 2.5-inch opening - Class IV and V hitches

Many vehicles have the space to fit 2-inch receiver tubes.

Recommendations on buying a car tow hitch

Any car can accept a car hitch and tow a load. But not every vehicle will perform well in the towing role. Keep the following considerations in mind when fitting out your vehicle with a car hitch.

Any car can accept a car hitch and tow a load. If you expect or plan to tow considerable loads regularly, use a pickup or an SUV as your towing vehicle. 

Preferred towing vehicles

If you expect or plan to tow considerable loads regularly, use a pickup or an SUV as your towing vehicle. The sturdy frames of those vehicles can handle the strain of heavy towing loads better than the lighter, less durable frameworks used in cars.

Trucks and SUVs also use bigger engines that produce greater power. They have the power to spare for towing heavy loads like boats and campers, especially if you need to go uphill or over uneven terrain.

Still, fitting your car with a tow hitch isn’t a bad idea. The need to hook up a trailer and tow it will come up at some point. It’s also unlikely that such a payload will turn out too heavy for your car.

Pick a tow hitch according to the expected load

You want a car hitch that can easily support the loads you expect to tow. Remember that larger loads require higher classes of hitches.

For heavier loads, try to get a weight-distributing hitch. It enables your car to carry more weight while also reducing the stress on the rear axle.

Check the hitch ball and the ball mount of the camper or trailer that you will attach to your vehicle. Like the hitch, these parts can only support so much weight. Make sure that the payload’s weight doesn’t exceed the maximum weight rating of your car hitch and its parts.

Cost of a car hitch

Available in single pieces and as part of a kit, a car hitch goes for anywhere between $34 and $362 on CarParts.com. We offer hitches in all five classes plus the intermediate III/IV medium-duty class, and with receiver tubes that measure 1.25 inches, 2 inches, and 2.5 inches.

Enter the year, make, and model of your car in the filter bar. You will quickly find the car hitch guaranteed to fit your vehicle and your requirements.

Important Facts You Need to Know About Hitch

There's more to hitching a trailer than just securing the bracket between the trailer and your vehicle. If you're planning to pull a trailer for a family road trip or for more convenient cargo loading, then you should have a hitch wiring kit ready.Hitch wiring kits contain everything you need to make sure that you can use the lights on the trailer's rear. A hitch wiring kit features connectors and adapters compatible with your vehicle's rear lighting system.Once the connectors are properly wired to the car's rear lighting, you can easily activate the trailer's brake, signaling, and tail lights. This way, you won't have a hard time signaling to the motorists behind you. A hitch wiring kit, once installed on your vehicle, also helps you avoid accidents such as rear-end collisions.To help you use your beloved trailer more conveniently, CarParts.com has plenty of hitch wiring kits readily available for you.


• A hitch wiring kit from us allows you to activate the trailer's rear lights.

• Our hitch wiring kits helps you drive more safely.

• Our hitch wiring kits will last for miles on end.

Things to Consider When Looking for a Hitch

If you're going on a road trip and you need to carry a trailer that will contain all your stuff, you'd better invest in a heavy-duty hitch ASAP. This component is also useful for emergency cases when you need to tow a vehicle that has broken down. The hitch comes in a variety of forms and sizes that are intended for different applications. When buying one, your main consideration should be the tongue weight that it can handle. The tongue weight (TW) is the weight carried by your car and the hitch. To find out what type and class of hitch is perfect for you, here are the things that you need to consider when buying a hitch for your ride.

Type

The type of hitch that you need depends on your vehicle and the trailer's size and weight. Generally, hitches can be classified into two types: weight-carrying (WC) and weight-distributing (WD).

  1. Weight-carrying (WC) ? used in applications where your vehicle's weight and suspension can accommodate trailer weight up to 3,500 lbs.
  2. Weight-distributing (WD) ? used for heavy trailers that weigh up to 10,000 lbs; an attachment that slides into a Class III, IV, or V WC hitch and distributes TW; provides stability while towing.

Class

Depending on your vehicle's weight and the heaviness of the load that you're going to carry, you can choose from several classes of hitches to fit your needs.

Class I - Light duty

  • For compact, mid-size, and full-size cars; mini trucks and vans; and full-size trucks, vans, and SUVs
  • Uses a 1.25-inch square receiver opening that attaches to bumpers, truck pans, and vehicle frames
  • Maximum gross trailer weight: 2,000 lbs.
  • Maximum tongue weight: 200 lbs.

Class II - Light duty

  • For mid-size and full size cars; mini trucks and vans; and full-size trucks, vans, and SUVs
  • Uses a 1.25-inch square receiver opening that attaches to vehicle frames or bumpers
  • Maximum gross trailer weight: 3,500 lbs.
  • Maximum tongue weight: 350 lbs.

Class III - Medium duty

  • For full-size cars and trucks as well as mini trucks and vans
  • Uses a 2-inch square receiver opening that attaches to the vehicle frame
  • Maximum gross trailer weight (WC): 6,000 lbs.
  • Maximum tongue weight (WC): 600 lbs.
  • Maximum gross trailer weight (WD): 10,000 lbs.
  • Maximum tongue weight (WD): 1,000 lbs.

Class IV - Heavy duty

  • For full-size cars, trucks, vans, and SUVs as well as mini trucks and vans
  • Uses a 2-inch square receiver opening that can be attached to the vehicle frame
  • Maximum gross trailer weight (WC): 12,000 lbs.
  • Maximum tongue weight (WC): 1,200 lbs.
  • Maximum gross trailer weight (WD): 15,000 lbs.
  • Maximum tongue weight(WD): 1,500 lbs.

Class V - Heavy duty

  • For full-size trucks, vans, and SUVs
  • Uses a 2.5 square inch receiver opening that attaches to the vehicle frame
  • Maximum gross trailer weight (WC): 12,000 lbs.
  • Maximum tongue weight (WC): 1,200 lbs.
  • Maximum gross trailer weight (WD): 17,000 lbs.
  • Maximum tongue weight(WD): 1,700 lbs.

Location

Depending on where you want the hitch to be attached, you can choose from the following locations in your vehicle:

  1. Front
  2. Rear
  3. Below front bumper

FINAL TIP:

A typical hitch will cost you about 100 to 250 USD. To make sure you get your money's worth, make sure you buy from a brand that is backed by a reputation that you can trust.

How to Attach a New Hitch in Seven Easy Steps

To make towing possible for your car, you need to install a good hitch that will be able to handle the weight of your vehicle and the load it's going to carry. You'll find tons of options out there in the market today; however, to make sure you get your money's worth, you need to get a hitch that is fully compatible with the specs of your ride. Once you have the perfect hitch, you can use the steps below to attach it to your assembly.

Difficulty level: Moderate

Things you need to prepare:

  • Jack and jack stands
  • Marker pen
  • Corded drill
  • Steel drill bits
  • Metric wrench set
  • Metric wrench set
  • Ratchet set
  • Hitch

Step 1: Before you get started, make sure your car is parked on a flat level surface. If you currently have a tow hook installed at back of your vehicle's frame, remove it using your socket and ratchet.

Step 2: Next, raise and support the rear side of your vehicle using your jack and jack stands. Raise it up until you have enough working space underneath.

Step 3: Once your vehicle is in position, place the hitch receiver under your vehicle and push it up against the frame. Then, use a marker pen to mark the mounting holes onto the frame. (Note: For this step, you might need some assistance because the hitch receiver is quite heavy.)

Step 4: Set your brand-new hitch aside and after that, get your corded drill and start drilling holes on the spots that you marked on your vehicle's frame.

Step 5: Once you've drilled the holes, put the hitch receiver on your car's frame and line it up with the holes you made earlier.

Step 6: When your receiver is in place, bolt it up and secure its connection using your socket and ratchet.

Step 7: After that, attach the hitch by sliding it in your receiver. You can secure it in place by locking it with a coder pin.

Helpful Automotive Resources

Step Bumper vs Receiver Hitch
April 29, 2020
Step Bumper vs Receiver HitchHaving the ability to tow a trailer can prove extremely useful for both work and play. But not every vehicle rolls out of the factory with the parts required to tow vehicles and other loads safely. You’ll need to install the right accessory: either a step bumper or a receiver
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