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Steel Oil Pan
Replacement
Part Number: REPD311307
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$33.96
Product Details
Capacity : 5 qts.Sump Location : Rear Sump LocationQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Oil Pan and Oil Pan Gasket Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-010919-10-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$46.90
Product Details
Capacity : 5 qts.Sump Location : Rear Sump LocationDipstick Location : Without Dipstick PortComponents : (1) Oil Pan, and (1) Oil Pan GasketQuantity Sold : KitWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Steel Oil Pan
Replacement
Part Number: REPK311302
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$24.52
Product Details
Notes : Includes drain plugCapacity : 4.86 qts.Sump Location : Front Sump LocationQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Oil Pan and Oil Pan Gasket Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-110217-48-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$31.48
Product Details
Notes : Includes drain plugCapacity : 4.86 qts.Sump Location : Front Sump LocationDipstick Location : Without Dipstick PortComponents : (1) Oil Pan, and (1) Oil Pan GasketQuantity Sold : KitWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Steel Oil Pan
Replacement
Part Number: REPH311317
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$27.16
Product Details
Notes : Includes drain plugCapacity : 3.7 qts.Sump Location : Rear Sump LocationQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Oil Pan and Oil Pan Gasket Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-022415-13-B
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$35.72
Product Details
Components : (1) Oil Pan, and (1) Oil Pan GasketQuantity Sold : KitWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Aluminum Oil Pan
Replacement
Part Number: RB31130004
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$157.48
Product Details
Notes : With oil level sensor holeReplaces OE Number : 11137539412, 11137552414Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Oil Pan and Oil Pan Gasket Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-010919-02-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$162.15
Product Details
Notes : With oil level sensor holeReplaces OE Number : 11137539412, 11137552414, 11137548031Components : (1) Oil Pan, and (1) Oil Pan GasketQuantity Sold : KitWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Steel Oil Pan
Replacement
Part Number: REPJ311303
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$37.63
Product Details
Capacity : 6 qts.Sump Location : Rear Sump LocationQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Oil Pan and Oil Pan Gasket Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-010919-12-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$57.69
Product Details
Capacity : 6 qts.Sump Location : Rear Sump LocationDipstick Location : Without Dipstick PortComponents : (1) Oil Pan, and (1) Oil Pan GasketQuantity Sold : KitWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Aluminum Oil Pan
Replacement
Part Number: REPV311302
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$22.68
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : 038103601NAQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Oil Pan and Oil Pan Gasket Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-110917-14-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$28.85
Product Details
Replaces OE Number : 038103601NAComponents : (1) Oil Pan, and (1) Oil Pan GasketQuantity Sold : KitWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Aluminum Oil Pan
Replacement
Part Number: REPF311320
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$73.28
Product Details
Notes : Includes drain plugCapacity : 6 qts.Sump Location : Center Sump LocationReplaces OE Number : 9L8Z6675AQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Oil Pan and Oil Pan Gasket Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-110917-01-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$76.12
Product Details
Notes : Includes drain plugCapacity : 6 qts.Sump Location : Center Sump LocationDipstick Location : Without Dipstick PortReplaces OE Number : 9L8Z6675AComponents : (1) Oil Pan, and (1) Oil Pan GasketQuantity Sold : KitWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Aluminum Oil Pan
Replacement
Part Number: REPF311301
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$47.02
Product Details
Notes : Includes drain plug; Must use gasket for 2005-07 vehiclesCapacity : 5 qts.Sump Location : Center Sump LocationQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Page 1 of 35 | Showing 1 - 15 of 516 results

Oil Pan Customer Reviews

Steel Oil Pan
Apr 03, 2020
Great price and fits
R B
VERIFIED PURCHASER
Purchased on Mar 18, 2020
Steel Oil Pan
Dec 26, 2019
What I needed
Shipped fast. What I wanted.
Dessa Epps
VERIFIED PURCHASER
Purchased on Nov 30, 2019
Oil Pan And Oil Pan Gasket Kit
Oct 14, 2019
Works great
Fit like a glove will be ordering more parts for sure.
Matthew Pierce
VERIFIED PURCHASER
Purchased on Sep 29, 2019

Oil Pan Guides

Oil pans are detachable mechanisms made out of thin steel and bolted to the bottom of the crankcase. To maximize its function, it is molded into a deeper section and mounted at the bottom of the crankcase to serve as an oil reservoir. The oil pan also hosts the oil pump and on the bottom of which is the oil drain plug. When an engine is at rest, the oil pan gathers the oil as it flows down from the sides of the crankcase.
The oil drain plug can be also removed to allow old oil to seep out of the car during an oil exchange. The plug is then screwed back into the drain hole after the used oil is drained out. Drain plugs are usually constructed with a magnet in it, which in turn collects metal fragments from the oil. Other varieties contain a replaceable washer to prevent leakage caused by corrosion or worn threads in the drain hole.
Compared to other automotive parts, an engine oil pan is far more likely to leak. This is because it holds oil being thrown around which eventually finds a leak if there is one. Thus, extra care should be applied when installing an automotive oil pan. Most of the times, the metal at the bolt holes in the oil pan and front cover will be pushed inward around the bolt holes. This is caused by the gasket getting smashed due to their excessive tightening. As the oil pan attempts to stop oil leaks, the gaskets are rendered useless and the oil leak will just get worse. Careful attention must also be placed on the gasket when tightening the bolts and make sure that the gaskets are not being squeezed out from under the oil pan to prevent future oil leaks.

Oil Pan Buyer's Guide 

Summary

  • An oil pan is a  tray-like steel or aluminum container attached to the engine block.
  • It is the oil’s resting place before being pumped to the oil filter, cooler, and engine.
  • Oil pans can get dented due to suspension problems or running over road debris.
  • Oil pan components include oil pan gaskets, drain plugs, baffle tray and windage tray.
  • Oil pans can be sold individually, in sets of 2 or a kit and cost around $30 to $1,945.
  • It is important to keep your engine healthy and to prolong the life of your engine oil.

 

All internal combustion engines require lubrication to preserve its static and moving parts. This issue gave rise to the invention of the engine oil in the mid 1800s. A good motor oil multitasks from cleaning the internal surfaces of the engine to cooling down its moving components. And, in able for the oil to circulate the system, it is sucked out from a reservoir and pumped into the oil filter before being distributed to the engine. The reservoir where the oil sits is called the oil pan.

 

What is an oil pan and what is it for?

An oil pan is a tray-like steel or aluminum container that is attached to the bottom of your car’s engine. It serves as the oil’s resting place before it gets pumped to the oil filter, cooler, then to the engine. Oil pan varies in size, and most can hold up to six quarts of oil depending on the engine type. An oil pan gasket seals it to prevent oil from sipping out the gap. However, due to wearing, oil pan gaskets tend to fail and let your oil leak out of the pan. A leak could result to low oil level, which is why regularly checking your oil is very important.

 

To measure the oil level in your pan, you’ll need a dipstick. Dipsticks are slim rulers with “full” and “add” markings. They go deep down into the oil pan and can easily be spotted in the engine compartment due to its yellow trim handle. The first thing you need to do is to pull the dipstick out and wipe it with a rag before putting it back in for the actual measuring. This way, you can clearly tell the oil level without all the unwanted residue. You may also pinpoint oil pan problems by examining the floor on where your car is parked on. Droplets or a puddle of dark brown or black fluid right underneath your engine block are obvious indicators of a leak.

 

What are the common causes of oil pan damages?

Oil pans are located underneath your car, which makes it one of the first casualties of running over road debris like branches and rocks. Even though made of steel, oil pans can be dented by any road objects at high speeds. Negligence is one of the causes of damaging any parts of your car and a dented oil pan is no exception. A dent could be worrisome in the long run so pay attention to the road and drive with care. In these cases, installing a splash guard or skid plate is the best precaution.

 

Oil pan components you need to know

1. Oil Pan Gasket

Oil pan gaskets refer to the rubber, fiber, or cork ring that tightens the gap between the engine block and the oil pan. Another gasket material comes in a form of tubed silicone gel called gasket maker, which is spread along the rim of the oil pan before bolting it to the engine block. Upper pans use upper gaskets, while lower pan uses lower gasket.
 

2. Drain Plug

Located at the very bottom of the oil pan, the drain plug is a threaded bolt that comes with a washer. It is where you flush the old oil out before you replace it with a fresh bottle. Keep in mind that the oil is easier to drain when its viscosity is low. Low viscosity is achieved in warmer temperature because heat makes oil thinner. So make sure you drain during the day—preferably afternoon—instead of doing it at night. Other cars feature two-piece oil pans known as the upper and lower. If your car has this, you’re most likely to find the drain plug on the lower pan.
 

3. Baffle Tray

Baffle trays are unperforated trays that prevent  oil from moving around inside the oil pan. Baffle trays’ main purpose is to restrict large volume flow of liquid and allow small amounts to flow freely.
 

4. Windage Tray

Windage tray, on the other hand, is a sheet of metal that prevents the oil from splashing onto the crankshaft. If the crankshaft gets infiltrated by the oil, it could have the tendency to spin slower, eventually affecting the engine’s performance. Some windage trays come with crankshaft scraper to rid any oil that may cloud the crankshaft.

 

How much is an OE replacement oil pan?

Knowing the type of sump system your car utilizes can make your purchase easy. Since some cars have two separate oil pans which are the upper and lower, you might find yourself needing more parts than one. A set of two, which includes the lower and upper oil pans, costs $138. OE replacement kits are also available and they include gaskets, windage trays, and oil filters. Oil pan kits are priced around $65 to $470. Meanwhile, lower and upper oil pans that are sold individually are tagged around $30 to $1,900.

 

Why is it important to replace your damaged oil pan?

Failing oil pans is a primary cause of engine overheating. Motor oil cools the engine by absorbing the heat caused by the friction of its moving parts. It also lubricates these parts as they rub from surface to surface. With low oil level, the pistons would develop thermal energy from rubbing against the cylinder wall unlubricated. Continuous engine overheating may result to frying the engine dead. You can also prolong your oil’s life cycle by preventing oil leaks caused by a failing oil pan.
 

Important Facts You Need to Know About Oil Pan

The oil pan in your car is prone to leaking. To prevent oil from spilling, find quality oil pan replacement for the stock part in your car.
The oil pan-it is not the one you use to fry bacon, but it does prevent your engine from being "fried" up in the heat. You see, the engine is composed of an extensive cooling system that prevents the engine from overheating. The oil pan is a component of this system. It has a very important task: it stores oil that will be used to cool and lubricate your engine parts whenever the car is in operation.
This engine part is installed at the base of the engine crankcase, where it is firmly fastened by nuts and bolts. Whenever you have to change oil, which usually occurs every time your car reaches 2,000 miles, you can easily drain the transmission oil pan by unplugging the oil plug. Oil pans are usually made of thin steel sheets and cast alloys. But if you are looking for higher performance oil pans, then you should consider buying billet aluminum oil pans. This variety has a higher heat capacity, that's why it's often used for racing applications. Other oil pans are outfitted with premium rubber seals to provide added protection from oil leakage and premature wearing.
If you want to know more about oil pan gaskets, just browse through our website. Whether you're looking for an oil pan replacement or a performance oil pan, you'll find it here.

Oil Pan: Just the Facts

We all know that the engine needs oil for the lubrication, cooling, and cleaning of its parts. So it's only reasonable that you equip your car's engine with a highly efficient and fully functional oil. An oil pan is a detachable bowl installed at the bottom of the crankcase. After oil moves through the engine, the fluid drains into the pan for storage.Typically crafted from a thin metal sheet, the oil pan is molded with a deeper shape to easily accommodate the engine's oil supply. When you need to give the engine a fresh dose of oil, the pan can be removed for oil to drain out of the engine bay.With its indispensable function, it's just right that you use a high-quality oil pan for your vehicle. CarParts.com is here to help you with your replacement needs.


• This device assists in lubricating various engine parts and cooling the engine down.

• The pan acts as a safe storage place for engine oil.

• Our oil pans are crafted only from durable metals, to avoid oil leakage.

Choosing the Right Oil Pan for Your Vehicle

An oil pan is probably one of the most boring parts of the car-it's there to store oil, period. It doesn't have any mechanical parts, it doesn't take you a minute to detach it, and sometimes you don't even need to remove it to let the oil flow out. But did you know that it plays a very exciting and important part in keeping your engine cool and well-lubricated? The oil needed by your engine comes from this humble pan, and from there it gets distributed to other parts of your engine and your car. Your engine's oil plays an essential part in controlling temperature and lubrication, and as such, having leaks in your oil pan will lessen your engine's effectiveness.

Stock vs. aftermarket

If your oil pan has leaks or has developed damage or corrosion over time, a replacement pan with the same qualities and specifications as your stock pan will do the job. However, if you are planning to upgrade your car's performance, starting with an upgraded oil system-the oil pick up, oil pump, filter, bypass system, and of course, the oil pan-is key. Aftermarket oil pans improve on what the stock pan does. With their specialized design, they provide better oil control, greater durability, and even more horsepower for your engine. Deciding between getting a replacement factory oil pan and an aftermarket product will depend on what you are planning to use your car for.

Street vs. racing

If you're planning to build a dependent street car, look for an oil pan with a windage tray or crank scraper. The frequent turning, acceleration, and braking can cause the oil to flood to the sides of the oil pan. The windage tray and crank scraper can make your oil pan keep up with the repeated movement of oil inside the pan. They can also help prevent the buildup of excess oil on the crankshaft, which adds rotating weight and consequently reduces horsepower.

On the other hand, if you're going to use your car in drag racing, buy a specific one for the job. In drag racing, there won't be much oil movement while your car is traveling on a straight line. When you hit the brakes, however, oil splashes inside the pan. Because of this, a trap door is a standard feature of a drag pan. Look for aftermarket oil pans that have an oil recovery pouch to control the oil movement and route the oil back to the sump.

Always make sure that when buying a larger aftermarket oil pan, you consider its size and ensure that it will fit in your car. Some items like headers, cross members, and sway bars may interfere with larger pans. Otherwise, if you're just looking for a replacement for your worn-down oil pan, your best bet is a replacement factory product.

Maintenance Tips: Servicing and Mounting an Oil Pan

The oil pan stores the lubricant used to keep the engine running smoothly. Once it breaks, oil will leak and engine parts may be damaged by excessive heat. The engine will eventually break down. Good thing is, your oil pan is located at the lowest section of your crankcase, which makes it quite easy to access. As such, you can check and install the new pan by yourself. Here's how:

Tools you'll need:

  • Screwdriver
  • Thin, flat driver
  • 3mm Allen wrench

IMPORTANT: OEM gaskets typically hold onto the surface 5x longer, so they are best used as replacements.

Removing the old pan

Step 1: Remove your exhaust down pipe, transfer case, and axle bearing carrier.

Step 2: Loosen the oil pan bolts.

Step 3: Remove your old oil pan by sticking a thin driver between it and the block, but be careful enough not to chew up the block side.

Step 4: Once the pan is taken out, scrape the surface where an old gasket is attached.

Step 5: After cleaning the surface where your old pan had been, use the 3mm Allen wrench to install the studs that come with the pack of the new pan. NOTE: Do not run the bolt past the other end of the block. It might rub with the timing belt and cause wear.

Installing a new pan

Step 1: Clean your new pan's surface.

Step 2: Apply adhesive and place the gasket on the pan's surface.

Step 3: Position the new pan over the studs and lock it with the included nuts in the pack.

Helpful Automotive Resources

Oil Pan Leaks: What are the Causes and How to Fix
May 11, 2020
Oil Pan Leaks: What are the Causes and How to FixOil is considered one of the most critical fluids in a car because it lubricates (and provides a barrier between) the internal engine components. Without oil, friction between these components would increase, to the point of the engine parts overheating and failing.
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