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Seat Belt, - Black
Crown®
Part Number: BELT1B
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$31.86
Vehicle Fitment
  • 1976 - 1983 Jeep CJ5 All Submodels All Engines
  • 1976 - 1986 Jeep CJ7 All Submodels All Engines
  • 1981 - 1985 Jeep Scrambler All Submodels All Engines
  • 1987 - 1995 Jeep Wrangler (YJ) All Submodels All Engines
Product Details
Location : Front, Passenger SideNotes : 60" Non-RetractableColor/Finish : BlackDimensions : 60 in.Quantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1 year or 12,000-mile Crown limited warranty
Seat Belt, - Black
Crown®
Part Number: BELT2B
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$61.31
Vehicle Fitment
  • 1976 - 1981 Jeep CJ5 All Submodels All Engines
  • 1976 - 1981 Jeep CJ7 All Submodels All Engines
  • 1981 Jeep Scrambler All Submodels All Engines
Product Details
Location : Front, Driver SideNotes : Lap Belt; 2 Point; RetractableColor/Finish : BlackQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1 year or 12,000-mile Crown limited warranty
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Accidents and collisions are a part of driving. So make sure your car is equipped with a Seat Belt to keep you from flying off your seat when it happens.
Flimsy as it may seem, your vehicle's seat belt plays a significant role in your driving safety. When you use a seat belt, you're five times safer than when you don't wear it. Isn't this benefit enough for you to use the seat belt on the road?
There are actually several kinds of seat belts for automotives. The seat belt in your vehicle is the standard three-point belt. This car seat belt uses one continuous line of durable material to comfortably strap your body to the seat. This belt is designed to go over your pelvis, chest, and shoulders, to hold back more of your body during sudden stops and collisions. And although seat belts aren't guaranteed to save lives, wearing these significantly increases your chances of survival during vehicular accidents. By harnessing your body against the seat, a seat belt can prevent your head from cracking against your vehicle's dashboard or windshield.
Safety should always be your first priority. Equip your vehicle with a complete set of reliable seat belts. Properly wearing these belts is also important to ensure protection. If you want to be sure with the quality of your vehicle's seat belts, trust those that come from our store. Our store offers a wide array of safety parts and accessories because just like you, we want your ride to be safe.

Seat Belts Buyer’s Guide

Summary

·   The seat belt is one of the most important safety devices in a vehicle.

·   Seat belts secure and protect the driver and their passengers from collision energy that may cause injury or even death.

·       They are made up of four parts: the webbing, retractor, seat belt buckle, and seat belt tongue.

·   They distribute force across a wider section of the body and prevent occupants from diving into the car doors, dashboard, and windshield.

·   Seat belts are tested by vehicle manufacturers to meet the requirements of the NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) and Regulations.

·       There are four types of automotive seat belts. These are lap belts, sash/shoulder belts, multi-point belts, and automatic seat belts.

·       The cost of a replacement seat belt varies depending on your vehicle’s specific year, make, and model. OE replacement parts will generally cost you anywhere between $20 to $85.

·       According to the latest data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration or NHTSA, wearing a seat belt saved the lives of almost 15,000 people involved in vehicular accidents in 2017. More than 2,500 additional lives would have been saved in the same year, had these people buckled up on the road.

What are seat belts?

The seat belt is one of the most important safety devices in a vehicle. Seat belts secure and protect the driver and their passengers from collision energy that may cause injury or even death. These vehicle restraints are installed on the driver, passenger, and back seats.

They are made up of four parts: the webbing, retractor, seat belt buckle, and seat belt tongue.

Webbing

The webbing is the part of the system that is wrapped around the body of the driver or passenger. This polyester belt is designed to support more than 28kNw.

Retractor

The retractor is the winding mechanism that allows the webbing to extend or pull back. Upon impact, this component locks the webbing in place, securing the occupant on the seat. Retractors come with a locking mechanism that stops the movement of the webbing when it is unspooled at a rate faster than normal and when the brakes are applied quickly.

Seat belt tongue

The seat belt tongue is a metal component that is connected to the webbing. This part inserted into the seat belt buckle to secure the system.

Seat belt buckle

The seat belt buckle is the mechanism that fastens and releases the seat belt tongue. It is designed in a way that makes it extremely easy for the user to secure the belt and for rescue workers to free occupants in case of a vehicle crash.

What are seat belts for?

Seat belts are a critical component of your car’s crash safety system. These vehicle restraints keep occupants propped in the correct position, minimizing the risk of injury or death upon impact. The system is designed to stretch and absorb impact energy.

They distribute force across a wider section of the body and prevent occupants from diving into the car doors, dashboard, and windshield. These also prevent the driver and passengers from being ejected from their seats upon deceleration.

The seat belt mechanism in your vehicle is designed to work with older teens and adults. However, the system can also be used to secure additional vehicle restraints such as car seats and boosters that are designed for infants and children.

When did seat belts become mandatory?

The first seat belt law known as the Motor Vehicle Safety Standard was a federal law that took effect in 1968. This required auto manufacturers to build seat belt mechanisms into their vehicles. New York was the first state to require its drivers to wear a seat belt. Throughout the next eleven years, 48 states followed suit. New Hampshire is the only state that does not have a seat belt law for drivers

How to use a seat belt properly

·       Put your seat in an upright position.

·       Keep as much distance as possible between your belly and the steering wheel, while making sure that you can reach the gas and brake pedals comfortably.

·       Place the webbing away from your neck while keeping it on your shoulder. There should only be a minimal gap between your body and the seat belt.

·       Secure the lap belt below your stomach and place the seat belt tongue inside the buckle.

·       If the belt is too loose or too tight, you may use seat belt adjusters or extenders to get the proper fit.

How are seat belts tested?

Seat belts are tested by vehicle manufacturers to meet the requirements of the NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) and Regulations. Each model must undergo testing because vehicles have varying seat designs and seat belt anchor points.

The FMVSS 209 specifically outlines the requirements for testing seat belt assemblies for passenger cars, multi-purpose vehicles, buses, and trucks. A crash test is not always required for specific seat belt designs in the United States.

Types of seat belts

There are four types of automotive seat belts. These are lap belts, sash/shoulder belts, multi-point belts, and automatic seat belts.

Lap belts

As its name suggests, this type of seat belt features webbing that only goes over the waist horizontally.

Sash/Shoulder belts

This type of seat belt goes diagonally over the body of the driver or passenger. They were typically used in combination with a separate lap belt system.

Multi-point belts

Three-point seat belts are Y-shaped belts that were introduced by Volvo in 1959 and were developed by Nils Bohlin. It combines a lap and shoulder belt into one system. Most modern vehicles feature this type of seat belt.

Four or Five-point seat belts are mostly used in car seats and racing vehicles.

Automatic seat belts

Automatic seat belts are a type of vehicle restraint that was manufactured in the 90s. The mechanism featured a cross-chest belt that was mounted on the A-pillar that moves across the door frame and towards the B-frame with the help of a motor. The occupant then locks the tongue and buckle in place to secure the belt. As this type of system was prone to breaking down, automatic seat belts were quickly discontinued and replaced by airbags.

How much are replacement seat belts?

The cost of a replacement seat belt varies depending on your vehicle’s specific year, make, and model. OE replacement parts will generally cost you anywhere between $20 to $85. Replacement seat belt assemblies are usually sold individually.

When should seat belts be replaced?

Here are some of the common signs of a bad or failing seat belt assembly.

False latching

A common sign of seat belt failure is when you have trouble engaging the tongue in the buckle. You may think that the system is secure, but a seat belt that is not properly attached can become unlatched, even in a minor accident.

Webbing damage

The material of the seat belt is meant to withstand extreme force. If you notice any rips or damage on the webbing, it must be replaced immediately to prevent it from compromising your safety on the road.

Retractor failure

Consult a trusted mechanic as soon as you discover that your seat belts aren’t locking automatically when tugged by force or if you notice any excess slack even after the belt has been unlatched.

Seat and mount damage

Physical damage on the seats or the pillars where the seat belts are mounted could diminish the effectivity of using a seat belt.

Are seat belts really safe and why is replacing them important?

According to the latest data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration or NHTSA, wearing a seat belt saved the lives of almost 15,000 people involved in vehicular accidents in 2017. More than 2,500 additional lives would have been saved in the same year, had these people buckled up on the road.

Airbags alone cannot protect you from deadly collision forces. They are designed to work with seat belts, not in place of them. In fact, deployed airbags can cause fatal injury if you aren’t buckled up properly. Using a seat belt properly, without putting the belt under your arms, reduces your risk of injury by at least 45%.

To find the right OE replacement seat belts for your vehicle, you may use our website’s search feature. Simply plug in the correct year, make, and model to browse through our vast collection of compatible parts.

Important Facts You Need to Know About Seat Belt

It's a sad day when people start to see the seat belt as prohibitive instead of protective. Many people think that accidents are nasty things that happen to other driversafter all, the odds seem to support that mindset. The question is: are you really willing to risk the lives of those you love and yourself by ignoring a simple yet extremely effective safety measure? That's especially considering that they are the easiest things in the world to engage. The numbers are in, by the way. Since its introduction in 1946, the seat belt has been saving lives in increasing numbers all over the world.

The standard is the now-familiar three-point belt. It is a product of uniting the lap and sash belt into one cohesive unit, and is a required feature of every automobile released in the past few years. The reason they named it a three-point belt is due to the fact that it is attached via three main points: two on the car frame itself and one near or on the seat. This type of seat belt is effective because it distributes the energy of a blow to the car across the chest, pelvis, and shoulders evenly. That means that no single part of your body has to absorb the full impactavoiding potentially fatal damage.

Like any component in your car, this safety device has a lot more going for it than just the actual "belt". Some of the seat belt parts you need to keep an eye on include the retractor, the adjuster, the tongue and buckle combination, the anchoring points, andof coursethe elastic webbed belt itself. All these parts have to be in perfect working conditionelse the whole system fails. Luckily, considering how much they matter, finding high-quality parts for your seat belt is easymany great companies produce some of the most reliable in the market.

Seat Belt: Just the Facts

Isn't it amazing how a thin piece of fabric can end up being the difference between life and death? Wearing a seat belt prevents physical injury and thus increases your chances of survival in the event of a major accident on the road. As part of your vehicle's safety system, a seat belt significantly reduces the risk of injury by restricting the passenger's movement in cases of collisions and accidents. To ensure reliability, a typical car seat belt is equipped with locking mechanisms or inertia reels that tighten the belt when pulled quickly. When the vehicle suddenly stops, the seat belt tightens and prevents the occupant from hitting the vehicle's dashboard and windshield. So when you find that your vehicle's seat belt starts to show signs of deterioration, don't hesitate to get the belt replaced. Click over to our catalog and see the seat belt replacement units we have in store for you.


• For strength and durability, the webbing used for seat belts is usually made from polyester or nylon.

• Seat belts commonly used in vehicles are called three-point belts. This type of seat belt uses one continuous length of webbing, an inertia reel, and a locking mechanism.

• Nearly half of the states in the US currently enforce laws for seat belt use during driving.
 

Safety First: How to Choose the Best Seat Belt

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said that almost 13,000 people are saved every year by seat belts. Also called safety belts, seat belts are designed to protect passengers in case of collisions or sudden stops. They also reduce the risk of death for front-seat passengers by almost 50 percent in vehicular accidents.

If your car's seat belts are already worn, you must replace them ASAP. Seat belts that won't buckle or retract properly will only cause more damage. Though replacing seat belts is easy, choosing the best isn't. If you want new seat belts, there are some important things to consider, so you won't regret your purchase and sacrifice your safety.

Types of seat belt

Nowadays, cars can be equipped with different types of seat belts. Though they are all designed to keep you safe, you should know which type of seat belt is best for you.

  • Two-point: Basically, two-point seat belts have two attachment points. But because of the possibility of paralysis, two-point belts have been revised over the years.
  • Three-point: A three-point belt is similar to the two-point belt, but it's unitized. In case of a collision, the three-point seat belt distributes the energy of the moving body in three points: chest, pelvis, and shoulders.
  • Belt-in-Seat: Also called BIS, belt-in-seats are attached to the car seat rather than the vehicle structure.
  • 4-,5-, and 6-point belts: Typically found in child seats and race cars, these kinds of seat belts can cause injuries when installed in vehicles that aren't meant to have them. They can also cause paralysis if the car equipped with these kinds of belts doesn't have enough strength to prevent roof collapse during vehicle rollovers.

Proper seat belt fit

The best seat belt should fit you perfectly. According to the NHTSA, seat belts should fit across your shoulders and the middle of your chest. If you want to have a lap belt, it should go below your stomach and across your hips. For better and more adjustable seat belts, car dealers provide seat belt adjusters. If you're wondering, these guidelines also apply to children.

The best brand

Seat belts, just like other car parts, are widely manufactured because they eventually get damaged. Typically, seat belts range from $20 to $250. Price influences quality, so it's best to buy seat belts from trustworthy brands that don't sacrifice cost for quality.

DIY: Replacing Worn Seat Belts

Seat belts are very important when it comes to car safety. They are safety harnesses that are designed to secure passengers in case of collisions or sudden stops. If your car's seat belts are already worn, they have to be replaced immediately. This DIY guide will teach you how you can replace your car's seat belts-from retractor to buckle- in your own garage.

Difficulty level: Easy

Tools You'll Need:

  • Wrench
  • Screwdriver
  • New seat belts

Step 1: Find the bolts that secure your worn seat belt. These bolts are covered by a plastic top that you can pry with your hands or with a screwdriver. Depending on your car's model and make, the bolts may be at the floor, side panel, or side of the seat. Also, some seat belts are secured by one bolt, while others are secure by two or three bolts.

Step 2: Once you located the bolts, unbolt them with a wrench. If your car has a three-point seat belt, you have to unbolt the buckle, shoulder strap, and lap belt. If your car has a lap belt, then you have to unbolt the buckle and belt.

Step 3: Align the new retractor to the holes that you made when you unbolted the old retractor. Then, bolt it into place using your wrench. If you're attaching a three-point seat belt, connect the shoulder and lap belt before bolting them in place.

Step 4: Get the new buckle, and bolt it properly with your wrench. Once the buckle is in place, insert the seat belt's tongue into the buckle.

Step 5: To ensure that the seat belt is properly installed, pull the seat belt several times. If the belt stays locked, you installed the seat belt correctly. If it doesn't stay locked, make sure that all bolts are secured and tightened. Repeat all the steps to replace all your worn seat belts.

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