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6651 Shock Adapter Kit - Direct Fit
Part Number: B266651
0 Reviews
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$68.41
Product Details
Location : Rear, LowerAnticipated Ship Out Time : 3-4 business daysQuantity Sold : Set of 2
6651 Shock Adapter Kit - Direct Fit
Part Number: B266651
0 Reviews
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$68.41
Product Details
Anticipated Ship Out Time : 3-4 business daysQuantity Sold : Set of 2
6652 Shock Adapter Kit - Direct Fit
Part Number: B266652
0 Reviews
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$68.41
Product Details
Anticipated Ship Out Time : 3-4 business daysQuantity Sold : Set of 2
6654 Shock Adapter Kit - Direct Fit
Part Number: B266654
0 Reviews
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$42.53
Product Details
Anticipated Ship Out Time : 3-4 business daysQuantity Sold : Set of 2
KIT107 Shock Adapter Kit - Direct Fit
Part Number: KYKIT107
0 Reviews
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$14.49
Product Details
Location : Rear, LowerWarranty : 1-year KYB limited warrantyAnticipated Ship Out Time : Same day - 1 business dayQuantity Sold : Kit
Page 1 of 1 | Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results

Shock Adapter Kit Customer Reviews

KYB® KIT107 Shock Adapter Kit - Direct Fit
Jun 10, 2019
Correct part, slow processing & shipping
Needed this bushing spacer kit to properly install shocks. The processing of the order took longer than a competitor to ship parts to me. That was disappointing. The part ordered from here was the correct part. Also, the part came in an oversized box. Had they simply shipped it in a suitable container, the shipping costs would have been lower and the order possibly processed sooner.
Purchased on Aug 23, 2013

Shock Adapter Kit Guides

How to Repair Your Shocks with a Shock Adapter Kit

SUVs and trucks mainly make use of air shocks as a means to upgrade their capabilities. These systems vary ride height at the flick of a button or switch. This ability makes them one of the most dependable and versatile upgrades available on the market that offer extra support when balancing or towing for heavy loads. With that said, here's what you need to do in order to go about properly fixing your shock on your own without having to pay for expert mechanic labor to do it for you, thus saving you loads of money in the process. It takes about less than an hour for even a non-mechanic to finish this.

Difficulty Level: Moderate

What You'll Need:

  • Screwdriver
  • Socket set
  • Shock adapter kit
  • Air compressor

Step 1: Press the valve stem for each stock shock in order to completely deflate your existing air shocks. When removing them for fixing or replacement, it's imperative to make sure that there isn't any air on them at all.

Step 2: To every shock, you should trace the air lines in order to take note of any bends or kinks on them. If they're undamaged for the most part and mounted deep into the vehicle's body, then they could be reused.

Step 3: If the lines are damaged or mounted in easy-to-reach areas, you should be able to replace them with new valve systems and pneumatic lines. Almost all air shock lines will have rubber gaskets and screw adapters, enabling removal of one part or section.

Step 4: Disengage the shocks from the air lines by unscrewing and pulling free the large screw adapter on the shock's side. From there, unbolt the shock absorber from the bottom to the top mount.

Step 5: Both top and bottom mounts are usually similar in composition, which is a bolt on an eyelet. However, there are some truck models wherein the shock absorber plate is held by two screws on the top mount instead.

Step 6: After unbolting the eyelet, dislodge it and slide it off the mount bolt, with the top following suit. This will free your shock. Now you can replace your shock with air shocks by mounting the top bolt and sliding the shock onto the bottom's eyelet.

Step 7: Before cutting the zip tie holding the shock in compressed mode, you should first tighten the mounts. After that, press the shock as it decompresses onto the bottom bolt. Decompression is gradual, but if you miss, recompression takes considerable effort.

Step 8: The air lines should then be reconnected into the individual shocks using new gaskets. The stock gaskets found in each screw can be replaced with new ones if the line is momentarily pressed out of said screws.

Step 9: Use non-solvent lubricant to moisten the air lines prior to reinsertion. The screw should then be reinserted unto the line. As for the valve stems, use them to reinflate the system. Ensure proper pressure by checking with a tire gauge.

Step 10: Air shocks work best under load at 40-70 PSI. You can inflate the shocks for as high as 140 PSI depending on the circumstances (certain special situations can call for such a pressure rating). It's discouraged for motorists to inflate the shocks past 150 PSI or so or right below 20 PSI and lower.

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