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Throttle Position Sensor
Replacement
Part Number: REPB314201
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$13.58
Product Details
Notes : Blade type; 3-prong male terminalConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-010319-02-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$23.45
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-010319-03-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$25.58
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-011019-43-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$23.06
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-011019-44-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$22.60
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-012419-17-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$24.01
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Throttle Body and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-102617-47-B
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$119.72
Product Details
Components : (1) Throttle Body, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorReplaces OE Number : 12570800Quantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Throttle Position Sensor
Replacement
Part Number: REPF314202
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$20.98
Product Details
Notes : Bullet type; 3-prong female terminalConfiguration : 3-Prong Bullet Female Terminal; 1 Male ConnectorQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-012419-22-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$44.76
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Bullet Female Terminal; 1 Male ConnectorReplaces OE Number : F6TZ9F715HAQuantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Throttle Position Sensor
Replacement
Part Number: REPC314203
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$8.86
Product Details
Notes : Blade type; 3-prong male terminalConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-021419-08-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$19.13
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Throttle Position Sensor
Replacement
Part Number: REPD314206
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$17.02
Product Details
Configuration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-021419-11-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$24.31
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Throttle Position Sensor
Replacement
Part Number: REPH314201
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$18.48
Product Details
Configuration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyWarranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Idle Control Valve and Throttle Position Sensor Kit
Replacement
Part Number: KIT1-011019-52-A
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$57.91
Product Details
Components : (1) Idle Control Valve, and (1) Throttle Position SensorConfiguration : 3-Prong Blade Male Terminal; 1 Female ConnectorReplaces OE Number : 16022RAAA01Quantity Sold : Set of 2Warranty : 1-year unlimited-mileage warrantyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Page 1 of 44 | Showing 1 - 15 of 652 results

Throttle Position Sensor Customer Reviews

Parts arrived quickly. For the cost of shipping it should
Craig Warner
VERIFIED PURCHASER
Purchased on Jul 05, 2020
Very satisfied with the product, will share with family and friends!!!!and will continue to shop with you guys... THANKS!!!
Johnny Atkinson
VERIFIED PURCHASER
Purchased on Apr 03, 2020
PARTS WERE MATCH FOR MY REPAIR. PARTS WERE EASILY INSTALLED. WORKED FINE.
RICHARD KELLER
VERIFIED PURCHASER
Purchased on Nov 11, 2019

Throttle Position Sensor Guides

Important Facts You Need to Know About Throttle Position Sensor

Known as the vehicle's brain, the engine control unit (ECU) controls ignition timing, fuel delivery, transmission shifting, cruise control, engine torque reduction, and charging output of the alternator. However, the ECU wouldn't be as effective at all these tasks if the throttle position sensor is down. Positioned on the butterfly spindle,

The -INGs in Throttle Position Sensor Installation

What makes knowing the position of the throttle so important that it needs a sensor? This question usually pops up when you look at the small sensor attached to the throttle body. And with that statement, you have unconsciously doubted the function of one of the important parts in your car. The throttle position sensor determines the position of the throttle valve every time the engine operates. The signals given out by the sensor are high-frequency and can actually cause different - and sometimes dangerous - reactions from the other parts. Thus, proper installation of the sensor is vital for the survivability of your vehicle. To make sure that the sensor is properly installed, here are the basic -INGs to guide you:

Required skill level: Beginner

Required tools and materials:

  • Socket set
  • Ratchet
  • Screwdriver set
  • Safety glasses (optional)

Accessing the old sensor

Open the hood of your vehicle. On most car models,

Helpful Tips in Purchasing a Throttle Position Sensor for your Vehicle

The throttle position sensor (TPS) monitors the position of the throttle valve to inform the ECM if the engine is in idle, part throttle, or wide-open throttle. Through the voltage signal sent by the TPS, the ECM will know if there's a need to adjust and correct the air and fuel ratio. Does your vehicle stall after startup or is rough when in idle? If yes, you'd better check your throttle position sensor right away. If after testing and troubleshooting you find out that the TPS is in need of replacement, don't think twice. Below are some tips to help you find the right TPS for your ride:

What type of TPS should you get?

Though throttle sensors come in many different types, automotive throttle position sensors are offered only in two types: switch and potentiometer. To avoid compatibility problems, find out first the type and specifications of your stock sensor and look for an exact replacement.

Switch. This type of TPS features a switch that stays on to provide a continuous supply of electricity when the throttle is used. If the throttle is off, the switch will also turn off to prevent electricity from flowing.

Potentiometer. When the ignition is on but the throttle is off, this type of sensor sends very low voltage to the engine computer. It just increases the voltage as the throttle increases; the voltage can get to a peak of 5 Volts when the throttle gets to its maximum.

What other factors should you consider?

  • Resistance readings
Before your purchase, know the resistance readings of your stock throttle position sensor's wires. You can get this information from your owner's manual.

  • Good construction
Make sure the components of your replacement sensor are carefully assembled so the voltage signals will be precisely sent for improved fuel consumption and maximum power output.

  • Warranty
Go for a throttle position sensor that's backed by a noteworthy manufacturer warranty. Most units sold these days come with 1-year or 12,000-mile warranty, so if you can find a product with longer coverage minus the hefty price, that's definitely a good buy.

  • Price
The cheapest throttle position sensor you can find isn't always the best buy. But it doesn't mean you go for the most expensive one. While it's true that when it comes to auto parts, you get what you pay for, there are manufacturers, suppliers, and dealers who offer their items at reasonable prices. Consider the product's features, construction, quality, product fit, and warranty to determine if the TPS you're eyeing is worth the price.

Throttle Position Sensor Replacement: Here's How

For a more efficient fuel delivery, vehicles are equipped with a throttle position sensor (TPS) that sends a variable voltage output to inform the on-board computer about the vehicle's throttle position. This variable potentiometer includes mechanical moving parts that are prone to wear and tear. A malfunctioning TPS causes a variety of symptoms such as inconsistent idling, sudden engine stalling, bucking and jerking, hesitation when the vehicle is accelerating, and unexpected surge in the vehicle's speed during highway driving.

While a voltmeter can be used to check its condition, the throttle position sensor can't be adjusted or fixed, so as soon as it gets damaged, you have no choice but to replace it.

Difficulty level: Moderate

What you'll need:

  • Screwdriver
  • Voltmeter
  • Straight pin/T-pin/meter probe
  • Replacement TPS
  • Multimeter

TPS Voltage Check

Step 1: Prop the hood open and locate the throttle position sensor near the throttle shaft or body. Disconnect the TPS harness.

Step 2: Manually open the throttle valve and test the resistance between terminal 1 and 2 in three different accelerator pedal positions.

Step 3: When the pedal is fully depressed, the voltmeter should read a resistance of around 10 ohms; when partially depressed, you should record 2-10 ohms, and 2 ohms when the pedal is completely released.

If you notice that the resistance is out of the specified range, it's time to have your throttle position sensor replaced.

TPS Replacement

Step 4: With a screwdriver, loosen and remove the mounting screws and take your faulty TPS off the throttle chamber.

Step 5: Install the o-ring that comes with your replacement TPS. Mount the replacement TPS onto the throttle body.

Step 6: Put the screws back into their respective locations and tighten them. Reconnect the electrical connector.

Step 7: Start the engine and check if the sensor's output voltage is within specified range. You can also road test your vehicle to see if the check engine light turns on again.

Throttle Position Sensor Buyer's Guide

Summary

  • A throttle position sensor is a primary component in electronic throttle control, which commonly appears on cars from the 1990s onward.
  • Like any other sensor, the throttle position sensor relays the information it has collected to the electronic control module (ECM).
  • The throttle position sensor works with the mass airflow sensor and gathers information from various factors such as your RPM and accelerator pedal inputs.
  • It enables the computer to make adjustments on how much fuel it should release in relevance to the amount of air being fed to the engine.
  • Things like poor fuel economy, problems in power delivery, slow acceleration, and even exhaust system issues are just a few of the problems you could face if you ignore a malfunctioning throttle sensor.
  • You can deal with a bad throttle sensor in two ways:
    • You can resort to the much cheaper option which is to clean both the throttle body and throttle position sensor.
    • You can jump to replacing the throttle position sensor with a fresh replacement.
  • OE throttle position sensors on CarParts.com could cost you anywhere between $3 and $300.

It’s no secret that over 90% of cars today run on fuel, either gasoline or diesel. For your car to move forward and backward, the engine needs to burn fuel and have the pistons transform the combustion energy into mechanical energy that moves the crankshaft. The two main ingredients of combustion are gasoline and oxygen. Both need to be present for ignition to happen. However, let’s not skip the process of how air enters the system.

Internally-stored fuel gets pumped by the fuel pump from the fuel tank. Air, meanwhile, comes from an external source and enters through the air intake. One component crucial for the intake system is the throttle body, which regulates airflow to adjust engine power. Older cars rely on a cable connecting the accelerator pedal and throttle body. But cars nowadays employ electronic throttle control (ETC) which features a throttle position sensor (TPS).

What is a throttle position sensor?

A throttle position sensor is a primary component in electronic throttle control, which commonly shows up on cars from the 1990s onward. It replaces the cable that used to connect the accelerator pedal to the throttle body in older cars. It is a small electronic device that attaches to the throttle body. Like any other sensor, the throttle position sensor relays the information it has collected to the electronic control module (ECM). It has a black plastic housing of varying shapes and sizes that bolts on the side of the throttle body assembly.

What does a throttle position sensor do?

Before getting down on the throttle position sensor, you must know the importance of the throttle body. The throttle body is a mechanical device that releases the full potential of your engine by restricting or allowing more air to enter the combustion chambers. Different driving conditions demand dynamic adjustments in engine performance. The throttle body determines how much air gets inside your engine. To pull this feat off, the throttle body needs a sensor that would act as its brain in analyzing various information.

The throttle position sensor works with the mass airflow sensor and gathers information from various factors such as your RPM and accelerator pedal inputs. It relays this information to the ECM to make adjustments on the amount of fuel needed in relevance to the amount of air being fed to the engine. Despite its sheer size, the throttle position sensor is crucial in maintaining a proper air-fuel mixture.

Symptoms of a bad throttle position sensor

It is quite problematic to end up with a failing throttle position sensor as various engine tasks get affected. Things like poor fuel economy, problems in power delivery, slow acceleration, and even exhaust system issues are just a few of the problems you could face if you ignore a malfunctioning throttle sensor. You’re also at risk of damaging different components of the air intake system, so it’s best to know its symptoms to avoid such risks.

Here are the common symptoms of a bad throttle position sensor:

Illuminated check engine light

One of the first signs you’ll notice is an activated malfunction indicator lamp. This is a vague sign and only functions as a warning that something under the hood of your car is failing. It does not necessarily mean that it’s the throttle position sensor to blame as a lot of failing parts related to your engine can trigger this light.

If you see this warning, you can either wait for and observe an accompanying symptom or use an OBD-II scanner. Your best bet, however, is to bring your car to a certified mechanic for a thorough evaluation.

Decrease in power

Like an illuminated check engine light, any negative changes in your engine’s power cover an array of causes. However, it is a good reference point for troubleshooting your car. An improper air-fuel mixture because of a malfunctioning throttle position sensor can cause your engine to gasp and perform poorly.

Performance issues include: 

  • Jerky acceleration
  • Poor acceleration response
  • Surging even without stepping on the accelerator pedal
  • Capped speed
  • Engine misfiring
  • Accelerator lag or delay
Harsh idling and stalling

Varying speeds demand different amounts of air and fuel in the mixture. A failing throttle position sensor which is sending the wrong signals to the ECM can cause the mixture to become too rich or too lean. When idling or during bumper-to-bumper traffic speeds, your engine needs a specific ratio for it to stay running. Once this ratio gets disrupted because of incorrect data from the sensor, the engine might stall or vibrate wildly when on idle. Engine stalling can affect the surrounding parts and cause them to fail if it happens frequently.

Difficulty in starting the engine

Thanks to a bad throttle position, your engine wouldn’t get the right amount of air it needs for an ignition. So, you could face difficulty in starting your car. Sometimes your engine will crank, only for it to die again after a few seconds. Don’t wait for this to happen because if it did on the highway, you have no choice but to call for a tow truck.

Gear shifting problems

A bad throttle position sensor can also affect the transmission system. This can either make it difficult to change gears in a manual transmission car or affect the shifting pattern on an automatic vehicle. This is because the automatic transmission system relies on the throttle position sensor when changing the gears.

Poor fuel economy

If more fuel enters the engine, or if there’s not enough oxygen, the mixture will be too rich. If the mixture gets too rich, some gasoline will exit through the exhaust lines unburned and you could end up with bad emissions. Not only that, a rich or lean mixture can also worsen your car’s fuel consumption, which means you’ll be spending more than what you normally do on fuel.

Signs that the throttle position sensor needs a replacement

You can deal with a bad throttle sensor in two ways. First, you can resort to the much cheaper option which is to clean both the throttle body and throttle position sensor before proceeding to decide whether it is beyond repair. If cleaning the throttle position sensor didn’t work, the only option is to have it replaced before matters get worse.

The second option is the less time-consuming one, and it is replacing the throttle position sensor with a fresh replacement. You only should do this if you’re sure that it’s the sensor causing the problem and that it’s about time that it gets replaced. Remember not to wait before these throttle position sensor problems get worse, clean or replace a bad throttle position sensor as soon as you notice one or two symptoms.

Choosing a throttle position sensor for your car

The throttle position sensor (TPS) monitors the position of the throttle valve to inform the ECM if the engine is in idle, part throttle, or wide-open throttle. Through the voltage signal sent by the TPS, the ECM will know if there's a need to adjust and correct the air and fuel ratio. Does your vehicle stall after startup or is rough when in idle? If yes, you'd better check your throttle position sensor right away. If after testing and troubleshooting you find out that the TPS is in need of replacement, don't think twice. Below are some tips to help you find the right TPS for your ride:

What type of TPS should you get?

Though throttle sensors come in many different types, automotive throttle position sensors are offered only in two types: switch and potentiometer. To avoid compatibility problems, find out first the type and specifications of your stock sensor and look for an exact replacement.

Switch - This type of TPS features a switch that stays on to provide a continuous supply of electricity when the throttle is used. If the throttle is off, the switch will also turn off to prevent electricity from flowing.

Potentiometer - When the ignition is on but the throttle is off, this type of sensor sends very low voltage to the engine computer. It just increases the voltage as the throttle increases; the voltage can get to a peak of 5 Volts when the throttle gets to its maximum.

What other factors should you consider?
  • Resistance readings

Before your purchase, know the resistance readings of your stock throttle position sensor's wires. You can get this information from your owner's manual.

  • Good construction

Make sure the components of your replacement sensor are carefully assembled so the voltage signals will be precisely sent for improved fuel consumption and maximum power output.

  • Warranty

Go for a throttle position sensor that's backed by a noteworthy manufacturer warranty. Most units sold these days come with 1-year or 12,000-mile warranty, so if you can find a product with longer coverage minus the hefty price, that's definitely a good buy.

  • Price

The cheapest throttle position sensor you can find isn't always the best buy. But it doesn't mean you go for the most expensive one. While it's true that when it comes to auto parts, you get what you pay for, there are manufacturers, suppliers, and dealers who offer their items at reasonable prices. Consider the product's features, construction, quality, product fit, and warranty to determine if the TPS you're eyeing is worth the price.

How much is an OE throttle position sensor replacement?

Throttle position sensors vary in price depending on where you choose to buy it from. OE throttle position sensors on CarParts.com could cost you anywhere between $3 and $300. Aside from having a wide price range, CarParts.com only offers parts from reputable manufacturers in the country. You can guarantee the reliability and durability with the quality throttle position sensors across this price range.

How to replace a throttle position sensor

For a more efficient fuel delivery, vehicles are equipped with a throttle position sensor (TPS) that sends a variable voltage output to inform the on-board computer about the vehicle's throttle position. This variable potentiometer includes mechanical moving parts that are prone to wear and tear. A malfunctioning TPS causes a variety of symptoms such as inconsistent idling, sudden engine stalling, bucking and jerking, hesitation when the vehicle is accelerating, and unexpected surge in the vehicle's speed during highway driving.

While a voltmeter can be used to check its condition, the throttle position sensor can't be adjusted or fixed, so as soon as it gets damaged, you have no choice but to replace it.

Difficulty level: Moderate

What you'll need:

  • Screwdriver
  • Voltmeter
  • Straight pin/T-pin/meter probe
  • Replacement TPS
  • Multimeter
TPS Voltage Check

Step 1: Prop the hood open and locate the throttle position sensor near the throttle shaft or body. Disconnect the TPS harness.

Step 2: Manually open the throttle valve and test the resistance between terminal 1 and 2 in three different accelerator pedal positions.

Step 3: When the pedal is fully depressed, the voltmeter should read a resistance of around 10 ohms; when partially depressed, you should record 2-10 ohms, and 2 ohms when the pedal is completely released.

If you notice that the resistance is out of the specified range, it's time to have your throttle position sensor replaced.

TPS Replacement

Step 4: With a screwdriver, loosen and remove the mounting screws and take your faulty TPS off the throttle chamber.

Step 5: Install the o-ring that comes with your replacement TPS. Mount the replacement TPS onto the throttle body.

Step 6: Put the screws back into their respective locations and tighten them. Reconnect the electrical connector.

Step 7: Start the engine and check if the sensor's output voltage is within specified range. You can also road test your vehicle to see if the check engine light turns on again.

Helpful Automotive Resources

P0120 Code: Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor “A” Circuit
September 16, 2020
P0120 Code: Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor “A” CircuitNote: The definition of Code P0120 may vary depending on the vehicle manufacturer. It is best to consult a repair manual or repair database for the exact code definition. TP Sensors
P2101 Code: Throttle Actuator “A” Control Motor Circuit Range/Performance
September 15, 2020
P2101 Code: Throttle Actuator “A” Control Motor Circuit Range/PerformanceTo understand the code more, we have to discuss the basics of an ETC system. Basically, your vehicle’s ETC system controls your throttle valve opening. Your PCM then uses input from Accelerator Pedal Position (APP) sensors and throttle position sensors when analyzing ETC operations, including how to adjust the
P0123 Code: Throttle / Pedal Position Sensor “A” Circuit High
September 09, 2020
P0123 Code: Throttle / Pedal Position Sensor “A” Circuit HighDiagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P0123 code stands for “Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor “A” Circuit High.”
P0306 Code: Cylinder 6 Misfire Detected
July 22, 2020
P0306 Code: Cylinder 6 Misfire DetectedDiagnostic trouble code (DTC) stands for “Cylinder 6 Misfire Detected.” This code is stored by your car’s primary computer—commonly known as the powertrain control module or PCM— when it detects that cylinder #6 did not ignite properly. Your PCM may log code P0306 if it detects that cylinder #6 did not
P0068 Code: MAP/MAF – Throttle Position Correlation
August 26, 2020
P0068 Code: MAP/MAF – Throttle Position CorrelationDiagnostic trouble code (DTC) P0068 stands for “MAP/MAF – Throttle Position Correlation.” If the readings from one or more of these sensors contradict the data presented by the other devices, the vehicle’s computer, aka the powertrain control module (PCM), logs the OBD-II trouble code P0068. A discrepancy in the readings from
P2138 Code: Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch D/E Voltage Correlation
August 18, 2020
P2138 Code: Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch D/E Voltage CorrelationMost modern vehicles use electronic throttle control (ETC). The ETC system replaces traditional, mechanical throttle linkage with an electric motor that operates the throttle blade.
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