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Transmission Oil Line - Metal, Direct Fit, Sold individually
Vehicle Info Required to Guarantee Fit
$18.78
Vehicle Fitment
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Base 4 Cyl 2.5L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Base 6 Cyl 4.0L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Chief 4 Cyl 2.5L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Chief 6 Cyl 4.0L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Laredo 4 Cyl 2.5L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Laredo 6 Cyl 4.0L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Limited 6 Cyl 4.0L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Pioneer 4 Cyl 2.5L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1987 Jeep Cherokee Pioneer 6 Cyl 4.0L Transmission Oil Cooler Line Connector to Transmission
  • 1988 - 1993 Jeep Cherokee All Submodels All Engines
  • 1994 - 1997 Jeep Cherokee Country All Engines
  • 1994 - 2001 Jeep Cherokee SE All Engines
  • 1994 - 2001 Jeep Cherokee Sport All Engines
  • 1996 - 2001 Jeep Cherokee Classic All Engines
  • 1998 - 2001 Jeep Cherokee Limited All Engines
Product Details
Notes : 14 mm-1.5 Male Thread End 1 and 0.38 in. Quick Disconnect End 2 Fitting; Straight Fitting AngleWarranty : Lifetime Dorman limited warrantyAnticipated Ship Out Time : Same day - 1 business dayQuantity Sold : Sold individuallyProp 65 Warning :

Warning SymbolWARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Phthalates, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

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Jeep Cherokee Transmission Oil Line Customer Reviews

Transmission Oil Line - Metal, Direct Fit, Sold Individually
Jun 10, 2019
As good as original equipment
This part was used to replace an original equipment part purchased from my local car dealer. The quality was just as good and fixed an issue with a leaking original part.
Purchased on Aug 19, 2013

Jeep Cherokee Transmission Oil Line Articles

How to Tell What's Wrong with Your Jeep Cherokee Transmission Oil Line

Troubleshooting your Cherokee's transmission problems isn't something that you'd be looking forward too. There are a lot of factors that could influence your transmission assembly's performance, and narrowing them down to a single part would take some time. Thankfully, there are a couple of common symptoms that have ready solutions to them. Issues like leaks in your Jeep Cherokee transmission oil line can be easily spotted and fixed, without the need to hire a mechanic or visit an auto repair shop. Check out our guide and find out how.

Leaking transmission oil

Leaking oil is by far the most common problem that drivers face when it comes to transmission issues. Tracing a leak in your transmission system can be hard as you'll need to check numerous parts such as your transmission oil line, filler tube, pan gasket, and more. If you've traced a leak to your Jeep Cherokee transmission oil line, then you could replace this easily at home without the help of a mechanic. Sometimes, you just need to tighten the fitting on your oil line and you'd plug up the leak. If you are having problems tracing the source of the leak in your transmission system, then it's best to have a professional help you out instead.

Noise coming from the transmission

A buzzing or whirring noise is one of the first signs that you'll notice when it comes to transmission problems. The first thing that you need to do would be to check that your transmission fluid is at an adequate level, as too little fluid could damage your transmission assembly. You'd also want to check underneath your vehicle if you have any leaks. If you notice a small puddle of red fluid under your car, then you probably have a leak somewhere that you'll need to plug up ASAP.

Burnt smells

If you start to notice a burnt oil smell, then you might have a problem with clogged oil lines. This can lead to inadequate transmission fluid flowing through the transmission assembly, which in turn can damage some parts. You'll have to have your transmission system drained and flushed in order to get rid of any burnt oil. Clogged oil lines can be easily replaced, but you'd want to have a mechanic check your transmission system too just to make sure that nothing else was damaged.

Tips on Maintaining Your Jeep Cherokee Transmission Oil Line

Most transmission problems can be attributed to poorly maintained parts such as the transmission oil line. Over time, your Jeep Cherokee transmission oil line may get clogged up, which in turn will restrict the flow of oil to your transmission system. Your oil line might also wear out and leak, so you'll have to get that plugged up before it gets worse. Thankfully, you can keep your vehicle's transmission system, particularly your transmission oil line, from wearing out too soon with a couple of simple maintenance routines. Check out our short guide and find out how.


Perform a transmission flush


Old oil can cause your vehicle's transmission system to perform poorly, so you'd want to stick to a regular maintenance schedule and perform a transmission flush. For most vehicles, you'll need to flush your transmission fluid every 30,000 miles or three years, whichever comes first. You don't even need to hire a mechanic or visit a car repair shop as you could easily perform a transmission flush on your own. Remember, transmission repairs can get pretty expensive, so it's better to take the time to perform the flush every few years compared to paying a hefty fee in transmission parts repairs.


Check your transmission fluid levels regularly


It's good practice to regularly check the fluid levels of your transmission fluid as it's an easy way of detecting any problems with your vehicle's transmission system. Low fluid levels may mean that there's a leak somewhere in your vehicle. Oil that smells burnt may be caused by clogged oil lines, a defective fuel pump, or even very low fuel levels caused by leaks. You'll want to keep an eye on your vehicle's fluid levels as it's easier and cheaper to fill up as opposed to replacing and expensive part or two.


Change your transmission oil


Just like your engine's motor oil, you'll have to change your transmission oil after a few miles. For manual transmission systems, you'll have to change the fluid every 30,000 to 60,000 miles. Since automatic transmission systems run a bit hotter compared to manual ones, you'll have to change them at least every 25,000 to 30,000 miles. Old transmission oil can block your transmission oil line, causing the system to clog up, which could damage your transmission system.

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